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Exploding the magma
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Which AMSOIL Syntheic should be used in an '02?

It looks like they make 2 version of a fully synthetic oil.
One appears to be marketed towards 2007 and later diesels.
Premium API CJ-4 Synthetic 15W-40 Diesel Oil

And the other is marketed towards pre 2007 diesels
Synthetic Diesel & Marine Motor Oil SAE 15W-40

Would the 2007 and later oil be a better / superior choice over the pre 2007 oil?
Either will work fine, a 5W-40 will give you better cold flow protection.

Either should be fine, but check your owners manual to see if they require CJ-4. I run Amsoil bumper to bumper.
7.3s IIRC are set up to CH or CF, way before CI-4,CI-4+ or CJ-4. Any CI-4 and up oil will run just fine in a 7.3.
 

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Either will work fine, a 5W-40 will give you better cold flow protection.
:shrug: I am not considering a 5W-40 oil.

The two oils in question are both 15W-40. They are two different synthetic versions made by AMSOIL.

I'm trying to figure out if there is a benefit to the more expensive synthetic version marketed towards 2007 and later vehicles.
 

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Exploding the magma
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:shrug: I am not considering a 5W-40 oil.

The two oils in question are both 15W-40. They are two different synthetic versions made by AMSOIL.

I'm trying to figure out if there is a benefit to the more expensive synthetic version marketed towards 2007 and later vehicles.
Ok any particular reason you are eliminating 5w40 oil?

Either one will work fine.

Ci-4+ oil lend themselves to longer OCIs due to higher TBN numbers but the CJ-4 (post 2007) will do better against soot. Either one will work fine, I would just run whichever one is cheaper.
 

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5W-40 is still a "40 weight" when its warmed up. If you live in a real cold area in the winter the 5W is a pretty good advantage with the HEUI system and cold starts.
 

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Hood Rich
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I run 5W40 year round... Never a problem cold starting, even in the negatives... not plugged in....

 

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Exploding the magma
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I'm in NC, so the truck only sees temps in the teens a couple times a year.
Ok, well if your not worried about cold starts then I don't think a synthetic is really worth it IMHO. But you are set on Amsoil whichever one is cheaper should take care of you fine.
 

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Do the pre 2007 it works great and is cheaper I've run both in my 04 didn't notice a diffrence in the two so I run the one they recommend and is cheaper.
 

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Livin in the flatlands.
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Yup, go with the cheaper one. That's what I ran before I switched to the 5w-40
 

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:shrug: I am not considering a 5W-40 oil.

The two oils in question are both 15W-40. They are two different synthetic versions made by AMSOIL.

I'm trying to figure out if there is a benefit to the more expensive synthetic version marketed towards 2007 and later vehicles.
The 15W-40 CJ-4 (Newer Formula) and the 15W-40 CI-4 (Older Formula) will both work fine the newer CJ-4 oils are backwards compatible. The newer formulas comes with a lower TBN (10.5) which is an acronym for the additive package. The older CI-4 has a TBN of 12 new in the bottle. Why does the newer formula have a lower TBN? A truck with a DPF makes less acid than a truck with no DPF. The newer formula has less TBN because it doesn't need to combat as much acid as a truck with no DPF. This includes trucks that came with a DPF but removed them after the fact.

I would use the 15W-40 Amsoil Diesel & Marine oil (part number AME) because you don't have a DPf and the AME has a higher TBN to work with from the start.

Let me know if I can help with any questions about Amsoil or if you would like to use our offer for the 6 month Trial Membership inquiry.
 

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Exploding the magma
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TBN stands for total base number, it was reduced to protect the DPF. All trucks running ULSD have a less Acidic enviroment due the drastic drop in sulfur from 500ppm to 15 ppm. So there is no acid difference from DPF to non.
 

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Lubrication Addict!!
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I agree with MJ... If your only considering Amsoil 15W-40? The AME would be the perfect choice... I have seen MANY UOA that have come back with nothing but awesome results with this oil... My only hope is you have some type of Oil By-Pass System installed to take advantage of the extended oil change intervals with this oil... other wise you are wasting alot of hard earned money if you only leave this oil in for only 5K or 7K miles... But anyway... AME is a great choice.
 

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My only hope is you have some type of Oil By-Pass System installed to take advantage of the extended oil change intervals with this oil... other wise you are wasting alot of hard earned money if you only leave this oil in for only 5K or 7K miles... But anyway... AME is a great choice.
Yup. Using the Amsoil Bypass unit that has the full flow filter mounted next to it. Both with a Filter Magnet on them. Firm believer in those magnets. If you've never seen or held a neodymium magnet, they would blow you away. Those things are crazy strong. :eek:
 

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Lubrication Addict!!
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Yup: I did some research on magnets combined with oil filters as well as spin-on transmission filters... Found a great seller on e-bay who sells those magnets for corvette spin-on filters... It's 2 3/4inches in dia... have them on all my family autos... I first put 2 on my PSD {one on the oil filter & one on my remote spin-on trans filter}... Used the dremel on both filters... Oil filter had 5K miles on it... Trans filter I waited till 20K miles on it... I was really amazed at the findings... Since then I have recommended them to all my friends who buy new autos, who have plans on keeping these autos for more then 5yrs to install these magnets...I just wish I could have bought my PSD new and installed them then... {Seeing is believing}...
 

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Yup: I did some research on magnets combined with oil filters as well as spin-on transmission filters... Found a great seller on e-bay who sells those magnets for corvette spin-on filters... It's 2 3/4inches in dia... have them on all my family autos... I first put 2 on my PSD {one on the oil filter & one on my remote spin-on trans filter}... Used the dremel on both filters... Oil filter had 5K miles on it... Trans filter I waited till 20K miles on it... I was really amazed at the findings... Since then I have recommended them to all my friends who buy new autos, who have plans on keeping these autos for more then 5yrs to install these magnets...I just wish I could have bought my PSD new and installed them then... {Seeing is believing}...
Magnets: I am a believer after seeing also. We liked them so much we became a FilterMag Dealer. FilterMag makes super strong magnets to be used on oil filters for any car, truck, motorcycle just about any vehicle including flat ones for trans pans and diff covers.

We sell a fair amount of them and one thing I like about them you will never lose one. Once you buy it you will use it for the rest of your life. It will move from car to car with you. The only thing that will happen is you sell a car and forget to take it off. The most popular FilterMags for trucks are the RA series which are very strong magnets with upwards of 800lbs of pulling power for an RA450 which would be used on the 7.3L oil filter. The RA365 would be used on Dodge Cummins, Duramax and other larger filters 3.5-3.8" in diameter.

One of the most popular sellers is the MC series for street bike filters on Harleys, Goldwings, and the larger street bikes that have screw on oil filters.

Check them out at Filtermag.com
or at our website in the Filtermag section.
 
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