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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The short: The turbo pipe blew off of my 2006 F250 6.0 while accelerating from a stop sign and the truck shut off immediately. The engine has never hit again, or even bothered to tease me with a sputter. Instead, it just arrogantly cranks into perpetuity as if it is some diabolical fiend with a willful hatred of life. It had been bulletproofed a few weeks prior to this, and everything seemed to be alright after a few days of being back together. I drove it for a few weeks and then this frustrating breakdown occurred. The engine has pressure in the high pressure oil system and is getting fuel. It shut off immediately when the pipe blew and does nothing but spite me now. The only codes I am getting are glow plug codes. I have the Torque app to read ICP and IPR, and can't figure out what the problem is. If you can't tell, I am at my wits' end with fighting this jagged apparatus of torment.

The long: I have a 2006 F250 with the 6.0 Powerstroke diesel that has about 260,000 miles on the clock. I noticed it was building pressure in the degas bottle, so decided to go ahead and replace the head gaskets and put in the head studs. This is the second 6.0 to which I have done such work, as I did this job on my brother's truck a few years ago and his truck has been fine. Before the bulletproofing job the truck had shut off twice while sitting at idle. To be specific, it was idling smoothly and just shut off without warning. Both times it started back up easily and immediately so I did not think much of it; therefore, I have no idea if those incidents are related to my current dilemma. The truck has always ran and idled smoothly, that is, when it will agree to run, and the two shutoffs are the only unusual behaviors it has ever displayed prior to the head work. It has always started quickly, whether hot or cold, and consistently started much quicker than my brother's 2003 6.0.

After we did the bulletproof job, the truck was very slow to start up again, but I expected this. The turbo pipe blew off on the initial drive; however, I was not too worried about this because the coupling was not very clean and the clamp had not been fastened very tight. The truck did not shut off when this happened. The next day, I drove a short distance and after turning the truck off it would not start again a few minutes later. It would crank quickly, but didn't act like it was getting fuel. Again, I did not think much of this since I had just done such serious work. After a long amount of cranking and coaxing, it fired up and ran fine. Furthermore, it continued to start quickly and run fine for a few weeks thereafter. I mentally wrote this event off as some effect of having done the head work and the engine not yet running enough to sort out itself; yet, it may be related to the current problem. After a few weeks of operating smoothly without any further incident, it decided to grace me with a wonderful breakdown while accelerating.

While accelerating from a stop sign, the turbo pipe blew off and the engine immediately stalled. It would not hit and had to be towed home. We tried starting the truck with the ICP sensor unplugged and plugged. Nothing makes a difference. It turns over quickly but acts as if the injectors are not attempting to work. At first I thought this was a problem with the high oil pressure system, but now am thinking it is an electronic problem of some capacity. No codes are shown other than glow plug codes, although the ICP sensor voltage code is displayed when it is unplugged. The glow plug codes were present prior to this incident.

I have no idea if the turbo pipe blowing off has anything to do with the real problem or not, but it all happened at once and now it will neither start nor run.

I used the Torque app to check the ICP and IPR data, and have some findings posted below. Since I initially thought there might be a high pressure oil leak, I replaced the high pressure oil stand pipes. This did make an improvement in the data, which showed that the engine consistently gained about 400 more psi while trying to start. It is worth noting that the IPR duty cycle never rises to 85%, but seems to float in the 50s and 60s after installing the new stand pipes. On my brother's truck, the IPR goes to 85% duty cycle and then bleeds down. I wanted to suspect a problem with the IPR, but since the ICP pressure is reading around 1250-1350psi, it appears the truck has adequate pressure to start. I generally keep the ICP sensor unplugged. The FICM is getting about 47.5-48.5 volts, so I am not suspecting that it is the problem, but I am open to someone's insight of such mysteries. The rear most wiring harness plug going into the FICM has the plastic broke, which damages my confidence in it, but this was its state when I first started working on the truck. The truck does not smoke or anything like this when trying to start, and it didn't produce a unique smoke prior to this breakdown.

Any help and wisdom on this problem is greatly appreciated, this feels like beating my head against a brick wall!!
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I'm going to assume those numbers are while cranking, and that explains the low battery voltage. If that is not the case, let us know.

Do you hear the injectors cycle when you turn the key on?

You have TorquePro, but it can't do everything. Get FORScan for your phone (or laptop if you have an adapter for that) and see if you have sync. Without sync, the PCM will not command the FICM to actuate the injectors. FORScan is about 4.99 I think. In addition to sync, you can run a bunch of diagnostics too.
 

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Did you check your turbo? Maybe it exploded?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The low battery from the screen shots of the Torque app are after a while of cranking. I have had to charge the batteries numerous times now. I think the injectors are cycling with the key on, it makes the multiple "grrr" sounds. One of which is the vacuum pump, and the other is in the center of the engine.

I will download the Forscan app and look into the sync. I have wondered about this, but didn't realize there was an app to check the FICM sync.

I do not think the turbo blew, it still moves freely and doesn't show any catastrophic damage anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I also discovered yesterday that the ICP sensor plug is messed up, and it was not truly plugged up when I thought it was. The plastic clip is broken, and the rubber yellow seal keeps it from staying snug. If I have someone hold it in while cranking, I can get different data from the Torque app.

With the ICP sensor securely making contact, the IPR does rise to 85% duty cycle, but there is no movement in the ICP pressure. Does this mean that the HPOP is bad? That the numbers I get with the ICP sensor unplugged are artificial? I have heard that the truck gives fake numbers to its electronics in the event that the ICP sensor fails to keep the truck from stalling.

I don't know why I would have gained 400psi from installing the high pressure oil stand pipes if this is the case, but if it truly is the HPOP I would be glad to have some resolution.
 

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Well that's a whole different can of worms you just opened! lol Sorry to laugh, but that's just so darn typical of these engines....make you think it's one thing and then one small detail comes to light which changes your whole perspective. With this new knowledge, here's what I would do. First, I would purchase a new pigtail, with proper self sealing shrink tube, and replace that connector. After that is done, check those numbers again.

Yes, the system will lie to the PCM and give predetermined ICP data when the ICP is disconnected, so you're most likely seeing that data. Assuming this is what's happening here, and that when you get a new connector your IPR is 85% and ICP is below 500, you do have a problem somewhere in the HPO system. Since you have a '06, it's not likely to be your HPOP. '05 and later HPOPs were rather reliable. Instead, it's most likely the STC fitting, injector o-rings, nipple cup o-rings, standpipes, or dummy plugs. Since you replaced the stand pipes, we can probably rule those out. There are two ways to go about this, though. First, you can just throw parts at it and replace everything else in the system. Not a bad idea if you want to have new everything and not have to worry about another part of the system failing later on, but also not the smart way. The other idea is to use a special IPR fitting adapter which allows you to apply high pressure air (100-150 PSI or so usually) to the system, and then you listen for leaks. Once you determine what is bad, you just replace that.

Myself, I do things a little differently depending on whose truck I am working on and what they want to do. If it is my personal truck, or one that belongs to a family member, I go above and beyond, but base what I do on the known history of the truck. So, knowing that the heads were just off, I'm going to assume new o-rings were installed on the injectors, to include the top black o-ring. Most people do not touch the nipple cup o-rings when taking the oil rails off, so I'll assume those are old, and we know the dummy plugs are as well since you said you only replaced the stand pipes. That leaves the STC fitting. You haven't said anything, so I would actually take a look at it when I had the HPOP cover off and see if it is the new or old design. I would then apply air, see what is leaking, replace that part AND every other o-ring in the system that I wasn't certain was new or new-ish. This way I would be certain I replaced the problem and I have refreshed the system which SHOULD minimize the chances of a failure later on. However, I have to emphasize that after you replace the items, do another air test. This is to make sure there wasn't something else in there that was bad (like one of the new stand pipes) or that you didn't cut an o-ring upon installation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I did replace the injector o-rings when the truck was torn down, but I did not do anything with the HPOP. Also, I replaced the dummy plugs when replacing the stand pipes, sorry for not clarifying that. I actually purchased the tool to test the system with air, but have not used it yet. Will this be able to tell me if the STC fitting is bad, and the HPOP as well?

I appreciate your help, this situation is frustrating. Navigating this problem feels like finding one's way in a cave with minimal lighting.
 

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Don't feel bad. The first time doing a lot of things on this platform is daunting, but after doing it once you'll just sorta have a feel for it usually.

When you say you replaced the injector o-rings, did that include the top, black o-ring? Only the Alliant kits come with it. And if you did, did you make sure the c-clip went OVER the o-ring? I've made that mistake before. Wasn't long til that sucker let loose! lol Also, good call on the dummy plugs.

Yes, doing the air test will be able to tell you if the STC is bad or if it is the HPOP. There are quite a few threads on this already, so go ahead and read up on it, but some basics are to make sure you remove the oil filter before doing it, and remove the HPOP cover along with turbo. That part about the cover only applies to '05 and up, because the '04 and '03 have a different pump and cover setup. Anyway, if air comes out of the STC fitting, it's bad. Simple as that. Same as any other o-ring. If you hear air coming out of the engine somewhere but can't tell where (like it's coming from somewhere down inside, past the HPOP) remove the oil filler cap and the CCV hose from the driver's side valve cover, then listen at those holes. If it's loud at one, but quiet at the other, there is a leak somewhere on the loud side...injector, nipple cup, etc. So, pull that valve cover and take a look/listen. If, however, there are no leaks but there is a gurgling coming from the oil filter, then you have a bad HPOP. Another possibility (and one which no one wants to experience....but is also VERY rare) is there no leak from up top, no gurgling, but still air coming from down inside the engine. That means the hard lines going from the STC to the stand pipes have a crack in em somewhere. That requires pulling the engine to fix. However, with as sudden a stoppage that you had, I'm leaning towards STC fitting. Other o-rings tend to go slowly. STC is usually works fine one day and doesn't the next.

One thing....I don't know which IPR fitting you got, but some out there are plumbed for 1/8" NPT, some for 1/4" NPT, and some are a metric 12 x 1.5 with an o-ring. The NPT fittings will go into the metric, but don't actually seal well. Make sure you know which one you have, and get the correct adapters for it. Took me a while to get mine set up right. Since the metric stuff isn't easily found at plumbing stores, if you need metric go to your Fastenal store and see if they have an adapter. If not (mine had to special order it) try auto parts store that does hydraulic fittings. I just had em make me a 2 ft long fitting with the M12 on one side and a 1/4NPT female on the other side. I then put an air hose fitting into that which fit into my compressor chuck. Yeah, was a little expensive (hose was cheap but those fittings were about $20 total) but it allowed me to be set up properly and not have to rig it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I found the time to get back to working on the truck, and went to pressure test the oil system at the IPR. I was surprised that I did not detect any immediate leak or gurgles. In fact, I was not able to hear anything. The system held 120 psi for about an hour. I didn't have a stethoscope, but shouldn't this indicate the high pressure oil system is fairly well intact?

However, I did have another interesting find. There appears to be some shard of debris inside the IPR. The IPR did not have a screen; I edited this post after finding out it was supposed to have one. I have some pictures attached to this post of the debris. I made a video where one can look in the IPR while I rotate it, but there is not a straightforward way to post it here. These images are screenshots from the video.

I used Forscan to check the FICM sync, and that test indicated the injectors were synced correctly.

Thoughts on this debris? It looks like a plastic shard.

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Be careful with low voltage. You should never drop below 10.5 volts when cranking. Low voltage will ruin a FICM. Also, a FICM can be bad even if the Main Power (voltage) is reading fine (48 volts).

That said, if you find no leaks in the high pressure oil system with the air test through the IPR valve port, then the IPR valve is probably the issue causing the low system pressure.
 

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Honestly, doesn't really matter what the plastic is from. It's a foreign object which is probably preventing the IPR from moving. I'd first try flushing it out with some electronics connector cleaner (similar to brake parts cleaner, but safe for plastic/rubber). If it doesn't come out easily, use a phillips screwdriver and push in on the valve inside the IPR while flushing with cleaner. I usually put the screwdriver on the bench and push down on the IPR. If these don't work, you'll probably need a dental pick or something small like that.

I would also take a look inside your pump. It's possible the screen for the IPR came off inside there. If so, you'll have to find a way to get it out. Hopefully the last person to pull the IPR was just a dummy and didn't put the screen back on before reinstallation. When you put yours back in, please make sure you buy a new seal kit with screen. Ford parts only! Oh, and that screen can be a pain to get on and not break. Watch a few videos to get tips on how to best do it. And speaking of videos, you can always upload your video to youtube and then just post the link here.
 
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I wouldn't put a screw driver in the ipr, I personally use a long Allen socket a little smaller than the inside of the ipr, push down on the ipr, blow parts cleaner into the small holes (now on top of the ipr), this should blow any crap out.
I agree you should be looking for the screen that's supposed to be there. The bad news is that you might need to remove the pump cover, which means the turbo has to come off. It doesn't take long, the 2nd or 3rd time, but the first time is a pita.
When you install the screen on the ipr, set the screen on a hard flat surface and push the ipr into it. Use a good Lube on the ipr orings before you install it, I've gone to using assembly goo.
Diesel Tech Ron has a good YouTube video about doing this, you should watch it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have made a practice of taking the turbo on and off at least once before breakfast, so don't worry, I already had it off before removing the IPR. I didn't see how it would be practical to take the IPR off with the turbo in place.

Could some sort of IPR failure cause the truck to shut off when driving? I actually ordered a new IPR, but may see what I can do with this old one.

I appreciate the help on this. I am ready for the truck to be running again.
 

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I have made a practice of taking the turbo on and off at least once before breakfast, so don't worry, I already had it off before removing the IPR. I didn't see how it would be practical to take the IPR off with the turbo in place.

Could some sort of IPR failure cause the truck to shut off when driving? I actually ordered a new IPR, but may see what I can do with this old one.

I appreciate the help on this. I am ready for the truck to be running again.
Yes, an IPR failure can shut you down when driving. Hopefully you bought an OEM (Ford) IPR. Finding a reliable aftermarket IPR is "hit or miss".
 

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The ipr is the pressure regulator, more pressure = more fuel
 

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long shot but this has happened before along with a turbo boot blowing off

have you checked the turbo to make sure the wheel spins freely ?

guy chased is tail for a long time and finally found the turbo would hang up and cause a no start
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
It appears that the problem was a bad IPR valve. The screen on the old one was easily extracted from the IPR socket, and the truck started almost immediately with the new IPR. I did replace it with an OEM Ford IPR, so I hope not to have any further problems with it.

It appears the turbo pipe blowing off had nothing to do with the shut down, or perhaps, it was somehow caused by the IPR failure.

The truck appears to be almost ready to go again. When the truck started, the turbo had a leak where the exhaust went into it, so I have got to adjust those pipes a bit to seal it up. Also, I've decided to replace the glow plug harness on the driver side since it is garbage. I don't know that I have ever encountered such a poor wiring harness. It disintegrates at the touch, and even the wires have snapped from mild handling. It looks like a pain to get the back two connecters out, but I aim to sort that out tomorrow.

Thanks for the help on this, and may God be with all who endeavor to work on the 6.0 Powerstroke.
 

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Some things are tough or picky and that's the real problem, glad you got it sorted.
 

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My experience is that one factor for such frequent wiring harness failures is engine temperatures. Some people don't have a problem with 220 degrees oil temp. I won't tolerate it. 210 (+/- a few) is the most I want to see. Coolant temps of 205 are about as high as I want to see also.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
All is well with the truck for now, and it has been driving great. I refitted the exhaust pipes and got rid of the leak, and also got the glow plug harness swapped on the driver side, which was the only side throwing codes.

The glow pug harness I bought came with a tool to remove the old ones, but they disintegrated upon touch. I ended up using a screw to pull them out. Hopefully all will be good now.

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