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Today marks the 66th anniversary of D-Day. This is the day the Allied forces invaded Europe to liberate it from the Nazi party in WWII. Around 10,000 Allied troops were wounded or killed that day. With 6,603 of those being Americans. Of those 6,603 American troops, 2,499 died. Please take time to remember the sacrfices of those on that day.
 

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In 2003 I was in the north of France working for three weeks, on one of my weekends off I drove along the Normandy coast stopping at several museums and numerous points of interest. When I stopped at the American cemetery at Omaha beach and walked among the perfect rows of crosses and then also down walking along the beach, it was a very moving experience, made the hair stand up on the back of my neck, it is still emotional just thinking about it. That day the weather was perfect, the sea was calm, it was very eerie thinking what about what had happened right there where I was standing.
I also made a stop at Pointe du Hoc... the bomb craters and broken concrete bunkers are still all there as if it had just happened a few years ago.
Anyone who has the opportunity should make it a priority to visit these places.
 

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I also visited Normandy, for the 50th anniversary of D Day, what a moving experience. God Bless the men that made the ultimate sacrifice that fateful morning.
 

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In 2003 I was in the north of France working for three weeks, on one of my weekends off I drove along the Normandy coast stopping at several museums and numerous points of interest. When I stopped at the American cemetery at Omaha beach and walked among the perfect rows of crosses and then also down walking along the beach, it was a very moving experience, made the hair stand up on the back of my neck, it is still emotional just thinking about it. That day the weather was perfect, the sea was calm, it was very eerie thinking what about what had happened right there where I was standing.
I also made a stop at Pointe du Hoc... the bomb craters and broken concrete bunkers are still all there as if it had just happened a few years ago.
Anyone who has the opportunity should make it a priority to visit these places.
Imagine climbing Pointe du Hoc with rope ladders facing heavy enemy direct and indirect fire! That's what the men of the 2nd Ranger Battalion had to do. Everyone who served both overseas and the civilians back home (Mostly Women) who kept the factories working were truly the greatest generation. I go to a local shopping mall now and I think to myself could we today sustain something like that again and the answer I get is very sad.
 

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Imagine climbing Pointe du Hoc with rope ladders facing heavy enemy direct and indirect fire! That's what the men of the 2nd Ranger Battalion had to do. Everyone who served both overseas and the civilians back home (Mostly Women) who kept the factories working were truly the greatest generation. I go to a local shopping mall now and I think to myself could we today sustain something like that again and the answer I get is very sad.
Actually, I believe that if it came right down to it, we would all be very surprised. Luckily, the fear of MAD kept most of our world leaders sane.
 
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