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peterbilt'in
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey

so here's my thoughts, i have projects i want to do but my welder cant keep up. little 110V century mig that's 10 years old.

Arc welders are 1/3 the cost of a mig, and can do some thick stuff and different types of materials. 1/16" to maybe 3/8" or more
i know Hobart and Lincon are good names, and paying a bit more for something that will work great and last long will be good.

whats your guys thoughts for a welder and or help in leaning my self to do it?

ah crap. to many i's in the title and i cant fix it.
 

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Twitch
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It isnt hard once you get the hang of it. We used Lincolns in shop. Never had a problem with them.
 

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its easy to learn to do, but you should take a class to learn how to weld properly. Being a structural ironworker i do a lot of welding in the field, and 95% of the time we use an arc welder. Hobart, Lincoln, Miller all are very good names. I wouldn't shy away from any of those. And as far as thickness of material, the sky is the limit, just crank up the heat, and weld pass after pass after pass
 

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<----Nice headlights!!!
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you get what you pay for! A three hundred dollar buzzbox from f&f or trctr supply is just that. Honestly, go to an auction and try to pick up an old used lincoln arc or a miller. Buying new stuff that is garbage isnt cost effective. Keep in mind that lincoln,miller,hobart, and etc make portable 'suitcases' that you hook up to your arc welding machine that make it a wire welder. IMO, gas welders are good if you work in a controlled environment but if you need to weld outside occasionally or have good air movement in your shop flux-cored wire is superior. Im not a 'welder' by trade but am certified in SMAW&Wire for what its worth.
 

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Twitch
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:whs:

Its hard at first but you will get the hang of it. The easiest electrode to start out on IMO is the 6011's. They are a general used electrode. Very useful for general metal and welding repairs. The bigger the thickness...etc...the bigger the electrode. The first two numbers stands for the electrode strength...like 60 means 60,000 pounds tencsile strength per inch...could be wrong on that..been a few years since I was in school.
 

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Personally I prefer mig with 75/25 shielding gas with 220 VAC single phase for normal lightduty welding up to medium duty welding. Any of the 3 major brands are good but being a brand whore I stick with Miller. Just my $0.02.

Jimmy
 

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I taught myself how to arc with a Lincoln AC-225. I bought it about 6-7yrs ago.(about $260 now) It wasn't hard to pickup at all. Nice not having to haul stuff to a welder.
 
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Lincoln AC-225 has allways worked for me. Keep in mind, not everyone that wants to arc weld can arc weld. I'm good enough to get me by and that's about it. I'll never be my brother who can weld just about anything and make it look like it was welded in a controlled factory. (without useing a grinder).

If you do look at the Lincoln AC-225, mine does shutdown once in a while if I'm welding for long periods of time. Not a big deal for me becuase while it cools down I have plenty of grinding to do.. LOL
 

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I've never used a shop welder but anything from an old 50's 200 to brand new 250's 300d's etc. (Lincoln here...) They'll do whatever you need to do...Since you're not going to be working with it in the environment I work in, a machine with digital displays would be very beneficial to you while learning.

It's all about amps, the higher the amps, the hotter it's going to burn and the bigger rod you can run. Same goes for lowering the amps.

If I were you, I'd get a machine that is capable of running all processes stick, MIG, and TIG. Once you get familiar with one process, move on to the next. TIG welds are probably my favorite just because of the cleanliness and control you have over the weld.
 

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What multi-process machine out there is affordable for a private owner? I don't know of any really.
 

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i learned stick wleding on a little 220 lincoln stick machine. i prefer lincoln and miller over hobart, more in mig welders though. this is my second year taking a college welding class, i would suggest try runnign 7024 or 7018. 7024 is a big a$$ rod but really easy to fun, real fluidy. thinkness is noth that big of a deal if you are willing to bevel and grind out.
 

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What multi-process machine out there is affordable for a private owner? I don't know of any really.
Well it depends on if you're talking about a shop welder (electric) or what I call a rig welder (engine driven.)

I'm not familiar with Millers and from the one's I've used, I didn't much care for them. So I'm going with Lincoln here....

Ranger 305 G

Price: $4600 listed. Digital amp/volt readouts, solid running machine. Will do all processes.

Ranger 250 GXT w/ stainless hood

Price: $4600 listed. This is the machine I've been running, it doesn't have the Chopper Technology in it, so it's kind of like a more old school arc. This is a runnin machine, it will run 1/4" rod as well as run A/C frequency for TIG.

Vantage 500

Price: $25,000 listed, *not affordable* but if you can find one, they did offer a Cummins engine (export only now, EPA BS.) These are badass machines, I will get one someday.

As for shop welders, for good ones, you're looking at $4000+ listed. This would probably be alright but for the price, I'd just buy an engine driven welder.

As for the price listings, they're what Lincoln states, you can get them way cheaper online or through local dealers. I got mine for $3000 brand new.

-clay
 

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Well it depends on if you're talking about a shop welder (electric) or what I call a rig welder (engine driven.)

I'm not familiar with Millers and from the one's I've used, I didn't much care for them. So I'm going with Lincoln here....

Ranger 305 G

Price: $4600 listed. Digital amp/volt readouts, solid running machine. Will do all processes.

Ranger 250 GXT w/ stainless hood

Price: $4600 listed. This is the machine I've been running, it doesn't have the Chopper Technology in it, so it's kind of like a more old school arc. This is a runnin machine, it will run 1/4" rod as well as run A/C frequency for TIG.

Vantage 500

Price: $25,000 listed, *not affordable* but if you can find one, they did offer a Cummins engine (export only now, EPA BS.) These are badass machines, I will get one someday.

As for shop welders, for good ones, you're looking at $4000+ listed. This would probably be alright but for the price, I'd just buy an engine driven welder.

As for the price listings, they're what Lincoln states, you can get them way cheaper online or through local dealers. I got mine for $3000 brand new.

-clay
Okay cool. Thats along the same lines I was thinking. Depending on how much welding one plans to do would dictate which model is the right one. I've used both the Miller and Lincoln engine driven ones, majority being miller pipe pros and trailblazers. I chose the the pipe pro for the 3 phase capabilities. But for the average garage welder I doubt they want to shell out that kind of dough.
 

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peterbilt'in
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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I'd say the Lincoln...however, it's A'C output so it's gonna be a bit different. For $200 more you can get one that is A/C - D/C. This is beneficial especially when you run into magnetized material or if you wish to play with the rod and see how the polarity affects the burn.

225 AC/DC Welder
 

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One advantage to going with an older stick machine that a lot of people overlook or dont know about is that you can gouge with them very easy and not worry about cranking the amps and damaging sensitve electronics inside like on a modern wire feed machine. This will allow you to cut through plate, burn out bolts or do just about whatever you can think of when used right. All you need is good air volume and make sure your ground is well secured.

I personally have a lincon SP175 with metal core wire and it does everything I need it to do, and if I need to weld beyond its limit then some multipasses take care of that.

Depending on what you go with and how much you are going to use the machine, look at the duty cycle and how that would apply to you. Some new wire machines look attractive for the price but if you look at the spec's they are sometimes rated very low in the duty cycle rating.


Good luck!
 

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those AC225's are on craigslist all the time for $150-$200....
 

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peterbilt'in
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
realizing... my biggest issue.. 220V outlet? :eek: the price on the arc's is a lot better the a good mig welder..

im great with a Mig, taught my self how to do it with the little century 110V gassless and at my old work i got to play with some HUGE mig, i think if it's even possible it was running 440V? something STUPID but you could single pass weld 1" thick plate and if u didn't turn it down you would burn through 3/4"
 

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dude if you have any questions and want to learn from some of the best join the AWS forum its like this sight for welding. this subject is waaaaaaay too vast to have a fiew little blurbs about it and than call it good as soon as you can run a bead, there is TONS of things to learn on this site. you want to know anything PM aevald he knows everything you can thinkof about welding. ;):poke::poke:

American Welding Society Online Forum
 
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