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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
"USE AT YOUR OWN RISK"

The COMPILATION of information in this thread is stuff I have either learned myself , or have borrowed from others. With that being said...if you have any info to add,..PLEASE EMAIL IT TO ME......Do not add it here,...make your own library of info .....lol


For those that already know about this stuff,...ignore me,....for those that don't, save this info,...to maybe help others in the future.





TRANNY TEMPS:





Alot of people freak out for no reason,...






Most automatic transmissions fail due to a breakdown of the transmission fluid caused by overheating. This chart provides a graphic display of heats contribution to transmission failure. The effect is also cumulative. Short term exposure to high heat levels (or even prolonged exposure to moderate heat) can break down the fluid to the point where even very short episodes of overheating will lead to failure.
 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
TORQUE SPECS



conversion for nm-ft-inch pounds..click link

http://seven.three.superdutypsd.com/index.php?pr=Torque_Conversion_Calculator


Tie Rod End —Inner, castellated nut....................90 Nm
Tie Rod End —Inner, Sleeve Clamp Bolts................55 Nm
Drag link to pitman arm nut.................148 ft-lb
Inner & outer tie-rod end nuts................85 ft-lb
Track bar bracket to frame.....................129 ft-lb
Track bar to track bar bracket bolt............406 ft-lb
Track bar to axle nut................................... 185 ft-lb
Radius arm to axle bolts, and bracket nut.........222 ft-lb
Pinion bearing preload..................................10-20 in-lb
Pinion nut............................................... ..220-280 ft-lb
Ring gear bolts............................................120-140 ft-lb
Bearing cap bolts.........................................120-135 ft-lb
Steel Diff cover bolts....................................30-40 ft-lb
Cast aluminum diff cover bolts......................... 24 ft-lb
Wheel lug nuts..........................................120-165 ft-lb
Diff filler plug.............................................18 ft-lb
Oil filter cap............................................... ...14 ft-lbs
Engine cover bolts.............................................15 ft-lb
Fuel return hose.............................................. .....19 ft-lb
Fuel supply hose.............................................. .....37 ft-lb
Injector hold downs....................................24 - 26ft-lb
EGR cooler clamp.......................................53 in/lb
Turbo mounting bolts.................................... 18ft-lb
Turbo pedestal bolts....................................23 ft-lb
Turbo inlet clamp.........................................9 ft-lb
Exhaust manifold.......................................... ...45 ft-lb
Idler pulley mounting bolt..................................... 41 ft-lb
Brakes, disc, front brake caliper pin bolts (2)......................42 ft-lb
Brakes, disc, rear brake caliper pin bolts (2)......................27 ft-lb
Brakes, front disc brake caliper anchor plate bolts (2)...........166 ft-lb
Brakes, rear disc brake caliper anchor plate bolts (2)......128 ft-lb
Brakes, Caliper Bleeder Screw................................13-18 ft-lb
Crossmember Bolts............................................. ....70 Nm
Driveshaft to transfer case bolts..................................111 Nm
Flex Plate Inspection Cover......................................20 Nm
Master Cylinder Outlet Tube Fittings.........................19 ft-lb
Shock Absorber (front)......................................76 ft-lb
Shock Absorber (rear).....................................46 ft-lb
Stabilizer Bar Link Bolts.........................................85 ft-lb
Starter Mounting Bolts......................................22-28 Nm
Thermostat Housing.......................................20-30 Nm
Torque Converter Drain Plug .............................12 Nm
torque converter retaining nuts............................35 Nm
Transfer Case Bolts...........................................31 Nm
Transfer Case, fill/drain plugs...............................27 Nm
Transmission Filler tube bolt..........................10-13 Nm
transmission fluid cooler tubes to cooler bypass valve............27 Nm
Transmission mount-to-cross member nuts...........94 Nm
Transmission, Auto, Drain Plug....................25 Nm
Transmission, Auto, Pan Bolts (20)............11 ft-lb
transmission-to-engine bolts................61 Nm
Water Pump Bolts...........................18 ft-lb
Water Pump Pulley bolts (4)...............18 ft-lb
Wheel Bearing/Hub Assembly Nuts (4).........135 ft-lb
Power steering pressure hose.......................24 ft-lb
Power steering pump mounting nuts......................41 ft-lb












ARP headstuds

1. Clean holes in block and make sure they're free of debris and oil
2. Screw studs into block -- snug, not torqued down
3. Install head gaskets
4. Install heads
5. Apply a liberal amount of the ARP moly lube on the threads of the bolts and nuts as well as both sides of the washer (where it touches the head and where it touches the nut). Very important step to ensure you get a good reading when you torque down the nuts.
6. Following the factory torque pattern (center ---> out), torque to 135 ft lbs.
7. Following factory torque pattern, torque to 180 ft lbs
8. Repeat torque procedure to 200 ft lbs, then 220, then 230, then 245/250.
 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
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AXLE WRAP:



For any of you with 36" or larger tires,...YOU HAVE A BUTT LOAD of axle wrap,...you just don't know it


Do a little test....have a friend get in your truck,...while you look at your rear pinion,...tell him to stomp on the skinny pedal....

After your done crying,....get some traction bars....lol

Here's what mine looked like,...I wish youtube had a way to stop the video,...it's much worse than you can see but it happens so fast ...it's hard to completely get the idea.


MY AXLE WRAP






AXLE WRAP AFTER TRACTION BARS

 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
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FILTER PART NUMBERS



******Even though I have listed the following part #'s...I recommend you watch this video****************








1994-2003

Air filter NAPA 6637





6.0L 2003-2007



FUEL:

Int'l: #1847170C93 (New Part #)
Int'l: #1847170C92 (Old Part #)
Baldwin: #PF7812
Wix: #33599
Ford: #FD-4604
NAPA: # FIL 3899
Racor: # PFF4604
Amsoil: # FFK60


AIR FILTER:

Wix: # 42731
Ford: # FA-1778
NAPA: # FIL 2731
Donaldson: # P603577
Amsoil: # 24490


OIL FILTER:

Wix: # 57312
Int'l: # 1840752C91
Ford: # FL-2016
NAPA: # FIL 7314
Racor: # PFL2016
Baldwin: # P7235
Amsoil: # EA088


TRANSMISSION:

External:

Wix: # 57702
Motorcraft: # FT145
Ford : # 3C3Z7B155BA


Internal Filter:

Motorcraft: # FT144
Ford: # 3C3Z7A098AA
 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
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TIRE AIR PRESSURE



A lot of people ask about tire pressure, if you've ever changed your tires from the EXACT stock ones,..IGNORE THE INFO ON YOUR DOOR!

each brand has it stamped on the side of the tire,..which is good,...but it's only a starting point.

Proper tire pressure will help fuel mileage,and tire wear.

As you can see in the pic below, if you have a certain type of uneven tire wear,..this is why.
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.............Too little.............................too much......................................just right






Too little air pressure will also cause the tire to grind the plys internally, and possibly rupture.

The PROPER way to get the pressure right is...the tire chaulk test.


For a good explanation on how to do a chalk test...click the clink

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.jeepfan.com/tech/TirePressureChalk/TirePressureCutAway.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.jeepfan.com/tech/tire-pressure-chalk.php&h=480&w=640&sz=17&hl=en&start=2&tbnid=aSQU2M0B2E1psM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=137&prev=/images?q=tire+pressure+contact+pattern&gbv=2&hl=en&sa=G

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
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FUEL ADDITIVES


As you can see clearly in the test that most of the common additives failed or barely meet the 520 standard...







I lifted the following from the Diesel Place and all credit goes to Spicer and Spicers Garage for the evaluation and write up.


The following are the preliminary results of a research study on diesel fuel Lubricity Additives. There is likely to be further commentary and explanation added at a future time.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this research was to determine the ability of multiple diesel fuel additives to replace the vital lubricity component in ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfer Diesel) fuel.

HISTORY:

ULSD fuel is the fuel currently mandated for use in all on road diesel engines. This fuel burns cleaner and is less polluting than it’s predecessor, called Low Sulfer Diesel Fuel. Low sulfer fuel contained less than 500 ppm of sulfer. ULSD contains 15 ppm or less.
As diesel fuel is further refined to remove the polluting sulfer, it is inadvertently stripped of its lubricating properties. This vital lubrication is a necessary component of the diesel fuel as it prevents wear in the fuel delivery system. Specifically, it lubricates pumps, high pressure pumps and injectors. Traditional Low sulfer diesel fuel typically contained enough lubricating ability to suffice the needs of these vital components. ULSD fuel, on the other hand, is considered to be very “dry” and incapable of lubricating vital fuel delivery components. As a result, these components are at risk of premature and even catastrophic failure when ULSD fuel is introduced to the system. As a result, all oil companies producing ULSD fuel must replace the lost lubricity with additives. All ULSD fuel purchased at retail fuel stations SHOULD be adequately treated with additives to replace this lost lubricity. The potential result of using inadequately treated fuel, as indicated above, can be catastrophic. There have been many documented cases of randomly tested samples of diesel fuel. These tests prove that often times the fuel we purchase is not adequately treated and may therefore contribute to accelerated wear of our fuel delivery systems. For this reason it may be prudent to use an after market diesel fuel additive to ENSURE adequate lubrication of the fuel delivery system. Additionally, many additives can offer added benefits such as cetane improver, and water separators or emulsifiers.

CONTENT:

In this study we will test multiple diesel fuel additives designed to replace lost lubricity. The primary component of this study is a side-by-side laboratory analysis of each additive’s ability to replace this vital lubricity. Additionally, claims of improving cetane, water separation or emulsification, bio-diesel compatibility and alcohol content will be noted. These notes were derived from information that was readily available to consumers (via the label and internet information) and none of this information has been evaluated for validity and/or performance. Cetane information has only been noted if the word “cetane” was used in the advertising information. The words “improves power” has not been translated to mean “improves cetane” in this evaluation. Information on alcohol content is provided by indicating “contains no alcohol”. Omission of the words “contains no alcohol” does not imply that it does contain alcohol. This information was simply missing in the information available to a consumer. However, the possibility of a form of alcohol in these products is possible. Additionally, information on dosages and cost per tankful are included for comparison purposes.

How Diesel Fuel Is Evaluated For Lubricating Ability:

Diesel fuel and other fluids are tested for lubricating ability using a device called a “High Frequency Reciprocating Rig” or HFRR. The HFRR is currently the Internationally accepted, standardized method to evaluate fluids for lubricating ability. It uses a ball bearing that reciprocates or moves back and forth on a metal surface at a very high frequency for a duration of 90 minutes. The machine does this while the ball bearing and metal surface are immersed in the test fluid (in this case, treated diesel fuel). At the end of the test the ball bearing is examined under a microscope and the “wear scar” on the ball bearing is measured in microns. The larger the wear scar, the poorer the lubricating ability of the fluid. Southwest Research runs every sample twice and averages the size of the wear scar.
The U.S. standard for diesel fuel says a commercially available diesel fuel should produce a wear scar of no greater than 520 microns. The Engine Manufacturers Association had requested a standard of a wear scar no greater than 460 microns, typical of the pre-ULSD fuels. Most experts agree that a 520 micron standard is adequate, but also that the lower the wear scar the better.

METHOD:

An independent research firm in Texas was hired to do the laboratory work. The cost of the research was paid for voluntarily by the participating additive manufacturers. Declining to participate and pay for the research were the following companies: Amsoil and Power Service. Because these are popular products it was determined that they needed to be included in the study. These products were tested using funds collected by diesel enthusiasts at “dieselplace.com”. Additionally, unconventional additives such as 2-cycle oil and used motor oil were tested for their abilities to aid in diesel fuel lubricity. These were also paid for by members of “dieselplace.com”.
The study was conducted in the following manner:
-The Research firm obtained a quantity of “untreated” ULSD fuel from a supplier. This fuel was basic ULSD fuel intended for use in diesel engines. However, this sample was acquired PRIOR to any attempt to additize the fuel for the purpose of replacing lost lubricity. In other words, it was a “worst case scenario, very dry diesel fuel” that would likely cause damage to any fuel delivery system. This fuel was tested using the HFRR at the Southwest Research Laboratory. This fuel was determined to have a very high HFRR score of 636 microns, typical of an untreated ULSD fuel. It was determined that this batch of fuel would be utilized as the baseline fuel for testing all of the additives. The baseline fuel HFRR score of 636 would be used as the control sample. All additives tested would be evaluated on their ability to replace lost lubricity to the fuel by comparing their scores to the control sample. Any score under 636 shows improvement to the fuels ability to lubricate the fuel delivery system of a diesel engine.

BLIND STUDY:

In order to ensure a completely unbiased approach to the study, the following steps were taken:
Each additive tested was obtained independently via internet or over the counter purchases. The only exceptions were Opti-Lube XPD and the bio-diesel sample. The reason for this is because Opti-Lube XPD additive was considered “experimental” at the time of test enrollment and was not yet on the market. It was sent directly from Opti-Lube company. The bio-diesel sample was sponsored by Renewable Energy Group. One of their suppliers, E.H. Wolf and Sons in Slinger, Wisconsin supplied us with a sample of 100% soybean based bio-diesel. This sample was used to blend with the baseline fuel to create a 2% bio-diesel for testing.
Each additive was bottled separately in identical glass containers. The bottles were labeled only with a number. This number corresponded to the additive contained in the bottle. The order of numbering was done randomly by drawing names out of a hat. Only Spicer Research held the key to the additives in each bottle.
The additive samples were then sent in a box to An independent research firm. The only information given them was the ratio of fuel to be added to each additive sample. For example, bottle “A” needs to be mixed at a ratio of “480-1”. The ratio used for each additive was the “prescribed dosage” found on the bottle label for that product. Used motor oil and 2-cycle oil were tested at a rationally chosen ratio of 200:1.
The Research Laboratory mixed the proper ratio of each “bottled fluid” into a separate container containing the baseline fuel. The data, therefore, is meaningful because every additive is tested in the same way using the same fuel. A side-by-side comparison of the effectiveness of each additive is now obtainable.

THE RESULTS:

These results are listed in the order of performance in the HFRR test. The baseline fuel used in every test started at an HFRR score of 636. The score shown is the tested HFRR score of the baseline fuel/additive blend.
Also included is the wear scar improvement provided by the additive as well as other claimed benefits of the additive. Each additive is also categorized as a Multi-purpose additive, Multi-purpose + anti-gel, Lubricity only, non-conventional, or as an additive capable of treating both gasoline and diesel fuel.
As a convenience to the reader there is also information on price per treated tank of diesel fuel (using a 26 gallon tank), and dosage per 26 gallon tank provided as “ounces of additive per 26 gallon tank”.

In Order Of Performance:

1) 2% REG SoyPower biodiesel
HFRR 221, 415 micron improvement.
50:1 ratio of baseline fuel to 100% biodiesel
66.56 oz. of 100% biodiesel per 26 gallons of diesel fuel
Price: market value

2)Opti-Lube XPD
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, demulsifier
HFRR 317, 319 micron improvement.
256:1 ratio
13 oz/tank
$4.35/tank

3)FPPF RV, Bus, SUV Diesel/Gas fuel treatment
Gas and Diesel
cetane improver, emulsifier
HFRR 439, 197 micron improvement
640:1 ratio
5.2 oz/tank
$2.60/tank

4)Opti-Lube Summer Blend
Multi-purpose
demulsifier
HFRR 447, 189 micron improvement
3000:1 ratio
1.11 oz/tank
$0.68/tank

5)Opti-Lube Winter Blend
Muti-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver
HFRR 461, 175 micron improvement
512:1 ratio
6.5 oz/tank
$3.65/tank

6)Schaeffer Diesel Treat 2000
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, emulsifier, bio-diesel compatible
HFRR 470, 166 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.87/tank

7)Super Tech Outboard 2-cycle TC-W3 engine oil
Unconventional (Not ULSD compliant, may damage 2007 or newer systems)
HFRR 474, 162 micron improvement
200:1 ratio
16.64 oz/tank
$1.09/tank

8)Stanadyne Lubricity Formula
Lubricity Only
demulsifier, 5% bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 479, 157 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.00/tank

9)Amsoil Diesel Concentrate
Multi-purpose
demulsifier, bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 488, 148 micron improvement
640:1 ratio
5.2 oz/tank
$2.16/tank

10)Power Service Diesel Kleen + Cetane Boost
Multi-purpose
Cetane improver, bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 575, 61 micron improvement
400:1 ratio
8.32 oz/tank
$1.58/tank

11)Howe’s Meaner Power Kleaner
Multi-purpose
Alcohol free
HFRR 586, 50 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.36/tank

12)Stanadyne Performance Formula
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, demulsifier, 5% bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 603, 33 micron improvement
480:1 ratio
6.9 oz/tank
$4.35/tank

13)Used Motor Oil, Shell Rotella T 15w40, 5,000 miles used.
Unconventional (Not ULSD compliant, may damage systems)
HFRR 634, 2 micron improvement
200:1 ratio
16.64 oz/tank
price: market value

14)Lucas Upper Cylinder Lubricant
Gas or diesel
HFRR 641, 5 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change)
427:1 ratio
7.8 oz/tank
$2.65/tank

15)B1000 Diesel Fuel Conditioner by Milligan Biotech
Multi-purpose, canola oil based additive
HFRR 644, 8 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change)
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$2.67/tank

16)FPPF Lubricity Plus Fuel Power
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
Emulsifier, alcohol free
HFRR 675, 39 microns worse than baseline fuel
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.12/tank

17)Marvel Mystery Oil
Gas, oil and Diesel fuel additive (NOT ULSD compliant, may damage 2007 and newer systems)
HFRR 678, 42 microns worse than baseline fuel.
320:1 ratio
10.4 oz/tank
$3.22/tank

18)ValvTect Diesel Guard Heavy Duty/Marine Diesel Fuel Additive
Multi-purpose
Cetane improver, emulsifier, alcohol free
HFRR 696, 60 microns worse than baseline fuel
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$2.38/tank

19)Primrose Power Blend 2003
Multi-purpose
Cetane boost, bio-diesel compatible, emulsifier
HFRR 711, 75 microns worse than baseline
1066:1 ratio
3.12 oz/tank
$1.39/tank

CONCLUSIONS:

Products 1 through 4 were able to improve the unadditized fuel to an HFRR score of 460 or better. This meets the most strict requirements requested by the Engine Manufacturers Association.
Products 1 through 9 were able to improve the unadditized fuel to an HFRR score of 520 or better, meeting the U.S. diesel fuel requirements for maximum wear scar in a commercially available diesel fuel.
Products 16 through 19 were found to cause the fuel/additive blend to perform worse than the baseline fuel. The cause for this is speculative. This is not unprecedented in HFRR testing and can be caused by alcohol or other components in the additives. Further investigation into the possibilities behind these poor results will investigated.
Any additive testing within +/- 20 microns of the baseline fuel could be considered to have no significant change. The repeatability of this test allows for a +/- 20 micron variability to be considered insignificant.


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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
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WHEEL BOLT PATTERNS, BACK SPACING, & CASTER/CAMBER



All Superdutys 99-08 that are singe rear wheel models use the 8x170mm bolt pattern.
Old body style(OBS) is 8x6.5

The 05-08's have larger brakes so the backspacing is different than the 99-04's.


In 05 ...engineers to upsized brake rotors by 5 percent, to 347 mm in front and 340 mm in rear.

Other improvements include larger calipers for both the F-250 and F-350. The front calipers have twin 60 mm pistons - up 11 percent from 2004 - for better braking feel. Rear calipers have twin 48 mm calipers on F-250 and twin 54 mm pistons on F-350 dual-rear-wheel models.





BACK SPACING


99-04......4"
05-07.......18"and 20"(from the factory) have 5.80" BS, and the 17" have 5.50"



00-04s came with 16s (unless it was a Harley Edition, they had 18s)...they don't clear the calipers on the 05-08s.
A 04 HD wheel would fit on a 05-08 since they were 18s, but they had less backspacing so they sit further out of the wheel wells on 05-08s.

05-08s fit on the 99-04, just rub on the leaf springs and sit further under the truck than they do on the 05-08.



Offset is the location of the wheel mounting surface in relation to the true center of the wheel......normally in mm.
Negative does move it inward.

So....

A 20x10 wheel with a 4.5" BackSpace will have approx -24 or -25mm offset.
A 20x12 wheel with a 4.5" BackSpace will have approx -51mm offset.


FYI, 25.4mm=1"




http://www.tirereview.com/files/Images/calculator2.jpg




WHEEL NOMENCLATURE & INFO








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__________________
 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
PART NUMBERS:

99-04






05-07


Locking hub: # PPA-GF33



08


08 Diff cover-8C3Z-4033-A
You will need new bolts to fit them on an earlier model however, as the bolts on the stamped steel diff covers arent long enough.
Bolts stainless hex head 5/16 18, 1 1/4 inch long.

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
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GEAR RATIO CHART



NOTE:
This chart is based on engine rpm at 65 mph with the transmission in a 1:1 gear ratio (Third with a three-speed manual, Fourth with a four-speed manual, or Third with an Automatic). Remember, the actual rpm indicated in the chart will be slightly higher (between 100 and 300 rpm) on vehicles equipped with an automatic transmission. This is due to the slip present in an auto transmission's torque converter.


Also needed to take into consideration is, the
WEIGHT and ROLLING RESISTANCE of the LARGER tires.










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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
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TRANSMISSION GEAR RATIOS 05+

The TorqShift 5-speed auto


1 st ....3.11 : 1
2nd.....2.22 : 1
3rd......1.55 : 1
4th..........1 : 1
5th......0.71 : 1

It also utilizes an alternate 4th gear, overdrive on 2nd gear of the 3 speed automatic component (0.72 x 1.55), that is 1.10:1 that is used under cold start conditions to aid engine and transmission warm up.


The 6-speed manual


LOW........... 5.79 : 1
1st..............3.30 : 1
2nd............ 2.10 : 1
3rd............. 1.30 : 1
4th................. 1 : 1
5th..............0.72 : 1


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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
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BUSHWACKER CUT-OUTS


OK....here we go.

I special ordered my truck, and I got it straight from the plant,..brand new...

A month before I received the truck, I already had a plan,...I wanted NO lift, 36's and Bushwacker cut-outs....so I had the parts in the garage,...before I even owned the truck.

My wife told me I had to wait a week,...before I dove into the project,...I lasted 6 days, before I started cutting.

Now...for the record...I have NEVER modified any vehicle before this point,....so everything I have done to my truck up to now,..has been my first time....

So... if I can do it....anyone can do it.

First off...have someone help you...it's easier,..they won't have to do much,..if anything they'll be there for moral support,...and to fetch you beer.


Things you need,...

1. Standard garage tools....wrenches, sockets, utility knife, screw drivers,..etc
2. Nibbler....to cut the fenders...NOT A SAWZALL!!!!!...
3. Sawzall...to cut the bumpers
4. heat gun...to custom mold the inner fender well liners if needed
5. 3lb hammer...short handle
6. misc...tape, paper, rags, sharpie, tape measurer....and maybe a grinder(make things easier).



Stock suspension vs 36's (no lift)






This is how much room I had, trying to stuff 36's under the stock suspension,...obviously something had to go....turning radious was....ummmm....yeah.....ZERO...lol









Now the nerve-racking part....like I said...I had never done this before,..so I was cautious.

They send FULL directions and a TEMPLATE with the Bushwackers...so don't worry.



The first fender took about 4 hours,.,...I cut a little,...had a beer, cut a little , had another beer,...etc etc etc

In this pic,...I was no where near the "actual" cut line...I was just testing the nibbler, and getting used to it at this point....so don't freak out...lol







After doing the testing,..and knowing what I know now...IT IS VIRTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO SCREW THIS UP....there is soooooo much room for error...a monkey could do this entire thing blind folded.


OK....here are some pointers.

tape off to prevent accidental scratches.






I also used HENRY 208 Roofing Mastic(brush on roof tar) to treat the cut edges....I HIGHLY recommend you do the same....3 years...not one spot of rust...do it.

Don't worry...the flares completely cover it.







As for the bumper...you have to do that last,..and you have to "eye-ball" a good line to cut,...use a grease pencil to draw a line that you'll want to cut....try to follow the arch of the flares...I didn't get mine exactly how I wanted it....but I made my own bumper...so it doesn't matter about matching once you put an aftermarket bumper on.

The flares come with a rubber edge molding, that goes between the flare and the fender,...I had some left over,... so I glued it to the cut area on the bumper.







Finished product:










Before:








After:







Schrapnel:



 

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King Dingaling
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9,386 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
differences between Early 99 & late 99

Early 99 has a wicked wheel in it from the factory.

The early99 has 120cc(AB code) injectors and the late99-03 has 140cc(AD code) injectors.

The early99 has 2" intake runners. The late99-03 has 3" intake runners.

The early99 has a 15* swash plate HPOP. The late99-03 has a 17* swash plate HPOP.

The early99 has one glow plug relay. The late99-03 has one glow plug relay and one air intake heater relay side by side. Both relays are on the passenger side valve cover toward the front of the truck.

The early99 has a totally different air filter that is not inter changeable with the late99-03. But you can put the late99 air cleaner assembly in the early99 truck. The only two aftermarket air filters that work on the early99 are the AFE stage 2 and the AIS.

The early99 track rod has smaller mounting bolts than the late99-03.

The early99 has shallower rotors than the late99-03.

The early99 has shorter hub-bearings than the late99-03.

The early99 front axle U bolts are square where they go over the spring pack. The late99 U bolts are round.

The early99 has a different pitman arm than the late99-03.

The early99 does not have the AIH like the late99-03.

The early99 does not have the automatic transmission fluid cooler in the radiator.

The early99 has no indicator light showing that "cruise" is on. Late99-03 has a cruise light that will come on when you set the cruise control. The early99 truck has the light in the dash already. A newer PCM(Yes it will plug in and will run better too) must be used to make the cruise light illuminate. It is a green light on the right side edge, half way up.
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King Dingaling
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Discussion Starter #15
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FRONT AXLES

1977-PREVIOUS F350, F250 snowfighter: low pinion dana 60, very weak.....

1978-1979 F350, F250 snowfighter: high pinion dana 60, kingpins, 35 spline outters, 30 spline inners, internally splined lockout hubs

1980-1985 F350/F250: high pinion TTB dana 50

1986-1991 F350: solid high pinion dana 60, king pins, 35 spline outers, 30 spline inners, internally splined lockout hubs, different spring spacing that 78/79 axle

1986-1989 F250: TTB dana 44HD/ TTB dana 50, both high pinion

1991-1997 F350: solid dana 50/solid dana 60, 50 hase smaller ring gear and axle shafts than 60

1990-1997 F250: TTB dana 50, high pinion

1999-2001 f250 and f350 SRW have dana 50 high pinion, metric pattern

1999-2001 f350 DRW have dana 60 front diff

2002 and up f250, f350 and f350 DRW have the dana 60 front diff.

1999-2008 F350: solid dana 60, high pinion, metric pattern

and even then,..believe it or not,...the front depends on build date,..and of course what ever they had laying around....seriously,..if the truck was supposed to get a D50,..but they didn't have any in stock at the time,..they threw in a D60


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I HAVE AN 01 F250 WITH A D60 ALSO THERE ISS 666 IN THE VIN# LOL
 
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