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Discussion Starter #1
!!WARNING!!
There are a lot of pictures in this thread.​

Earlier this year I reupholstered the seats in my 2000 F-250 and added heat and cooling to the factory seats. This thread is to show how that was done.
I used leatherseats.com for the seat covers and heating/cooling kits. This is the 100% leather kit for the 40/20/40 bench seats in a non factory color.

Starting with worn out factory tan seats, the drivers being power with manual lumbar.

 

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Discussion Starter #2
New cooling unit parts.


Starting with the passenger seat.


Removing the upper seat cover is done by unlatching a plastic catch at the bottom.


 

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Next up, there are several Velcro strips holding the leather down. Be careful removing them, the Velcro likes to detach from the seat foam.



 

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The bottom of the seat has similar plastic clips slid over metal.
You won't be able to remove all of the clips and the seat bottom cover till you remove the seat track and seat back.



 

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Discussion Starter #5
You will need to remove the seat belt and other accessories from the seat to remove the cover.
The seat belt uses a T50 torx bit.





Plastic clips need to be removed for the support bracket.


The reclining handle needs to go too, #2 phillips.



Hidden #2 phillips screw behind the reclining handle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Remove the plastic clip holding the trim.


Now you have access to remove the bolts holding the seat back to the seat bottom.




One side of the seat back is held in by a plastic clip. Just slide the seat back over and it comes loose. A screwdriver helps get over the hump.


 

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Discussion Starter #7
Now you have access to remove the seat track.







There is an extra bracket on the seat track, don't loose it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Now you should have access to pull the remaining clips off the seat bottom cover.



More Velcro on the bottom seat cover.



The bare seat bottom cushion.


Check the Velcro for areas that need to be re-glued.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now we can compare the cooling pad to the seat cushion. There is a bit of a conflict with the cooling pad covering the Velcro that holds the seat cover in place.



Marking the area to trim on the cooling pad.


Checking fitment of rough cut.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This is what the cooling pad looks like.



The cooling pad needs to sit flush with the seat foam, this is the mark for where to cut.


The new cover, I selected a bit darker beige than factory.


The new cover has a special backing with perforations to allow air flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cutting the seat foam for the cooling pad recess.
I tried the method recommended by leatherseats.com of cutting small squares.
A few lessons from that, don't try to pull the squares off, they don't come out even leaving some deep divots.
Later I tried scoring the foam in strips rather than squares, this worked much better.


The foam in the recess removed.


Checking that the cooling pad sits flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
The internals of the cooling pad. There is a mesh for air to flow in while you sit.



Cutting the mesh.




Next up, resealing the cooling pad so air is forced where it should be rather than out the end. I used contact cement but didn't want to take a chance of the seam coming apart with thermal cycles and being sat on. So I added some stitching, its not pretty but should hold.




 

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Discussion Starter #13
Test fitting the modified cooling pad. The edges are thin so they fold down for access to the Velcro.




The heart of the unit. This is the pletier assembly. Two different metals, pass a current one way for heat and the other direction for cooling.


The pletier has three air channels, one split input and two outputs. Below is the split input, you can see the two copper coils separated by a layer of plastic. One will be hot and the other cold depending on the button pressed. The blower will need to be connected to this side.


The exhaust side outputs air from the upper copper coil. It will vent cool air when using the heating function and hot air when using the cooling function.


The bottom of the pletier outputs the air you feel.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Modifying the other half of the seat for the cooling pad. I hadn't tried cutting in strips and was doing squares but cutting with a long utility knife worked well.



Using a die grinder with a sanding disk I smoothed out the recess that was cut in the foam earlier.




This is where I decided to put the exhaust for the top of the seat. If the seat is sealed, the pletier will heat up when cooling and will be unable to cool your back.



Testing that the tubing included in the kit would fit out this gap in the seat cover.

 

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First view of the seat back figuring out where to place the blower.


To feed the blower fresh air there is a plastic vent included. It will end up being mounted in the back of the seat.


A look inside the seat cover at the material behind the leather that will need to be cut for the intake vent.
 

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Getting closer with figuring out placement for all the parts in the seat back.



For test fitting, I added a bit of tape over the Velcro to make removing the seat cover slightly easier.


The cover over the seat back with the vent tube sticking out. The tube will be trimmed later.




Marking some foam to trim for the vent tube.


A bit less bulk with the foam cut and the seat cover down.

 

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Discussion Starter #18
Starting the prep the intake vent. I painted the vent and trimmed it for extra clearance. I was worried leaning against the seat would push the foam and blower close enough to the vent to create a rattle which is why it is trimmed.




Not a lot of room between the rear seat cover and the blower.



Marking where to cut the new leather for the intake vent. Important lesson here, open all of the boxes before starting. One of them has a template for this.


The screen on the blower can be seen here. Air should easily get where it needs to go.

 

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Discussion Starter #19
The outer cover for the intake vent.


How the two pieces of the intake vent should fit together. If the hole is too tight, the extra leather will prevent the vent from clipping together.


Now on to making a hole through the seat foam for the peltier.




Running the wire for the peltier and blower.



Discovered there were clearance issues with the side I chose to run the wire on so it was moved.




Intake vent mounted.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Exhaust tube trimmed so it cannot be seen.



The tube can be trimmed back without the leather collapsing and blocking air flow.


The blower and peltier wire running from the upper seat to the lower seat.
 
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