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AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs
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When are you supposed to change the oil on a new motor? I normally change mine every 3000 miles like clock work but does it need to be done sooner with a new motor, like after the 500 mile break-in?

So far I've got 3 1/4 mile passes, about 50-60 miles in high altitude, and probably around 80-100 miles runnin' around town here.
 

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Drink til she's cute
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I thought Dave said..change about the 500 mile mark..then go to your normal intervals.
 

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When are you supposed to change the oil on a new motor? I normally change mine every 3000 miles like clock work but does it need to be done sooner with a new motor, like after the 500 mile break-in?

So far I've got 3 1/4 mile passes, about 50-60 miles in high altitude, and probably around 80-100 miles runnin' around town here.
rotella 15-40
250
500
750
1250
then switched to synthetic and wont change til 4250...
 

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Cange oil at 500 mile break in mark. First 500 miles should not be driven hard. Don't switch to synthetic oil untill after a minimum of 1500 miles. That's how my motors work!!!!
 

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It's harder to brake in the engine with an automatic, but high load low RPM is the best way for initial brake-in. Sounds like you've already done the initial brake-in though. I'd change the oil now, then at 500, and 1500. After that go to whatever drain interval you want. You can also use synthetic right from hour 1 if you want. It's an old misconception that you can't run a new engine on synthetic oils.
 

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you want some of this?
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I used to think that break-in was BS. But I was schooled on that!
May not apply here, but I gonna post it up anyway.
The pistons are still somewhat soft when new, and will wear pretty easy. After getting heat cycled a few times they "work harden" and are good to go.Kinda like heat treating metals. I know for a fact it works on aluminum pistons, just aint so sure what ours are made of.??
I would think the same thing applies to these. If ya run it hard before its "broken in" it will be a looser engine, and maybe not last as long. But then, just how dang long are ya gonna run a high HP diesel anyway? Just to be safe I'd go ahead and change it.
We always broke in our four wheeler engines real easy and changed the oil after an hour or so run time.
But, this aint no stinking four wheeler, now is it?
 

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The pistons used in a PowerStroke are an aluminum alloy. The exact composition is a trade secret of the MFG. Different types of engines need to be broken in differently. I build a lot of engines at work and I always brake them in the way they'll get driven. Of course the way I would brake one in at work is a bit different than how I would if I was going to do the brake in by driving the vehicle.

I hardly ever build and engine inframe at work, it's all done on the bench and dyno run. Start by warming the engine up at a moderate idle. A several short 1/4 power pulls, maybe 10-15 minuets each. Cool it off at low idle and shut it off, check for leaks. Run it back up again and hold half load for 20-45 minuets or so depending on what engine, etc.

Idle down and run at high idle for a while. Then pull 'er down to full load and let it run. If it is gonna brake I want it to do it on the dyno (easier cleanup). So far I've never lost one. I've been doing A LOT of C9 Cats lately. Those I will run at 1300 RPM full load (around 345HP and 1100-1200ft/lbs depending on the air) for at least an hour. Change the oil and all the filters run the overhead, then repeat the whole process one more time. After that simply install.
 
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