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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased an 04 350, I received an Edge Insight CTS2 today and installed it, unfortunately I know nothing about the parameters of what “should be” for the gauges. Anyone care to help a brother out? Engine has been bulletproofed from a ford dealer prior to my purchase as well as an SCT that I currently have in Stock mode. Thanks for any help
 

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I've got to ask...do you know WHAT they did to bulletproof it? If they gave you a list of things they did, can you list them for us? I only ask because I can't see a dealer doing some of the things we would do to make sure the engine is properly taken care of, so I want to see if you still have things left to do.

As for what parameters to monitor, it depends on what you're doing and what options you have installed. For example, while many things can be monitored through the CTS, it will not do fuel pressure or EGT, because there are no built in sensors for those. I think you can get an EGT add-on for the CTS, but I believe you have to get a separate gauge for the fuel pressure. As for myself, I always have trans temp, fuel pressure, EGT, and boost up because I have those on an A-pillar gauge pod. On my tablet, I generally display voltage, FICM voltage, ICP, IPR, coolant temp, and oil temp.

You may already know, but just in case you haven't read up on them yet, here is what you are looking for and why...

Fuel pressure is vital to the health of the injectors. Installing the blue spring kit is almost always needed to keep decent pressure, and you should be shooting for 60-65 PSI, with it never dropping below 50. Supposedly 45 is ok per Ford, but people have had issues with it that low.

Voltage is the other engine killer. You NEED good voltage or you can do a lot of damage...primarily to the FICM. Good strong batteries are vital. I recommend AGM style. To help keep a good charge on them, many also recommend getting a high output alternator, generally about 180-250 amps. Along with the vehicle voltage, it's also important to watch the FICM voltage. It should never drop below 45 volts. Not even when starting. If it does, send it off for repair. FICMrepair.com is the universally accepted best place to send it.

EGT is exhaust gas temp. With temps rising up past 1300-1400, you can damage the turbo, so watching this is important. However, for the average person, you really don't need to monitor it because you're not going to get high temps on a stock tune and not towing. But, if you tow or if you have a tune, you'll want it. Generally, most people install the probe either in the exhaust manifold right behind the #8 cylinder, or up in the up-pipe collector just before the exhaust enters the turbo.

Trans temp is also a towing thing. It shouldn't get above 165 or so during regular driving. It can get very hot during towing, especially uphill at slower speeds, but the tranny is designed to handle a lot of heat. Having said that, I still have yet to see my temps go above 190.

Boost levels are important for two main reasons: if you have stock TTY bolts or to monitor how clean the turbo is. Stock pressure ratings are around 22-26 PSI. Anything above that has a significantly increased potential of lifting the heads and stretching those TTY bolts, leading to head gasket failure. So, making sure you don't go too high can save some repairs, potentially. If you have studs installed (properly), this engine can handle considerably more boost. People disagree on exactly how much boost it can handle before some components start to go, but 33-35 is within reason from what I have read. The thing is, a stock turbo shouldn't really go much higher than 26 PSI....but it can if the unison ring is all caked up with soot. The soot could stop the vanes from moving, which doesn't allow for changing the boost amount. Generally, this winds up giving a higher than normal boost pressure, so seeing higher pressure levels is an indicator that the turbo needs to be cleaned.

Coolant temp and oil temp: on their own it's fairly obvious; you want to make sure you're not overheating. Duhhh lol With coolant, it's easy to tell what's too hot, but engine oil is different. Seeing temps upward of 230 is quite possible when towing, and some have seen a little higher. However, what we really want to look at here is what's called the Delta, or the difference between the coolant temp and oil temp. These numbers can be way off when towing, but when not towing, driving on fairly level ground, after being fully warmed up for at least 20 minutes, and driving at a speed of around 55-65 MPH, they should be no more than 15 degrees apart. If they are, the oil cooler is clogged and needs to be replaced. A clogged oil cooler and lead to a host of other problems.

Finally, ICP and IPR. These tell you the health of your high pressure oil system. At idle, you should see a pressure (ICP) of around 500-600 PSI and an IPR of around 15-22% (how far open the "valve" is....sorta). These can vary a little bit. If your IPR is much higher, that means there is the beginnings of a leak, and the valve has to stay open longer to get the same amount of pressure. The max pressure, generally obtained during hard acceleration under WOT, is around 4000 PSI, though I have seen norms of 3500 and up for a perfectly functioning system. The IPR has a max setting of 85%, but typically doesn't need to go above 65% or so to get max pressure. If you ever see the IPR pegging at 85% (other than when initially starting, perhaps), there's a problem. Another way to use this info is when the truck begins to show signs of not accelerating as quickly as it did before. While driving steady, look at ICP and IPR then step on the gas and watch the two. If there is a leak, the ICP will not change much, but the IPR will increase a lot. Also, these two are used when diagnosing a hot no-start condition....and sometimes others as well.

There are more things to watch on occasion, but these are the big ones. Let us know what the dealer did to the engine, and we can tell you if you need to keep an eye on things, or if you need to take action.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate the feedback, I will take a screenshot of the service papers and add them on here. I bought the truck outright over the weekend and the main purpose of the purchase is to tow our boat and camper to fishing tournaments for my son as he’s on the high school fishing team. I hate that I know nothing and had no one to inform me on this stuff before the purchase so I hope I did not make a foolish decision in dropping the hammer on this truck! I’m taking it by a reputable diesel shop on Monday and letting them do a thorough once over in it. I just need it to be reliable for what I need, not looking for anything extreme or to blow the doors off of anything, just needed a better tow rig than my old Silverado was
 

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If you truly have a bullet-proofed 6.0, you won't be disappointed. They have their issues, but with good care and proper maintenance, they run well, produce good power, and last a long time.

Ask the shop you're bringing it to if they have a lot of experience with the 6.0. The 6.0 is a different sort of beast than a lot of other motors, and unless a mechanic is used to working on them, they can make mistakes. And, of course, before you have them do anything to it, I would run their suggestions by the people on this forum. We've had people tell us their Ford dealer wanted to swap out a part which had nothing to do with the symptoms they were experiencing. We're not perfect on here, and it is definitely difficult to diagnose through the internet, but we can at least help verify if your mechanic is on the right path or smoking crack.

Something to buy which is a must, IMO, is some sort of scanner. However, not just any scanner will do. While you CAN go out and buy a multi-thousand dollar scanner that will probably wash your clothes for you, I don't think anyone on here would recommend it. lol What most of us use are two apps for our phones. The first app is called TorquePro, and the second is FORScan. Those two apps, and a bluetooth OBD-II adapter, will handle almost all of your engine monitoring needs, and your ability to scan for trouble codes. As for the adapter, there are a lot out there, but don't cheap out. Get a good one. I don't remember the brand of the one @bismic1 recommends, but hopefully he'll let us know. You can monitor almost everything you need with Torque, and can scan almost everything, including the transmission, with FORScan.

Once you post that list, we'll let you know our thoughts on what you have. A few additional things I would do are: look at the color of your coolant, look at the tube which goes into your intake manifold...is it plastic or metal (make sure you're not looking at the tube going to the turbo), have your batteries load tested separately, and do a good visual inspection of everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is how I have the monitor set up currently. Let me know if I need to add or take anything away! I will send a photo of the sheet from ford where they bulletproofed it in just a few minutes
 

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For a document like that and in order for others to be able to read it you should convert it to a pdf file and then post it

Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk
 

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Even the pic of the CTS is too small. Supposedly (I've yet to try it) if you change the extension of the pic from .jpg to .jpeg it will post in a larger format instead of the fingernail. Hmmm....I think I'll go give it a test post! lol
 

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Well, the jpeg change didn't make it post a large pic within the post, but it did upload a larger size pic which does open upon clicking the fingernail, so it works, just in a different way than I was told. Give that a try. If you don't know how to change the file extension, just google "how to change file extension *your OS*".
 
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