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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings,

I'm hoping someone can help 'school me' on the status of current production diesel fuels in terms of types, quality and classification:

I just purchased a new 2015 F350 PSD, and from what little I can tell, there appear to be no real differences or options in the diesel fuel widely sold at commercial fuel stations (i.e., the product appears to be the same at all dispensers). But back in the mid 90s, when I owned my last diesel motor (7.3L International), there were 2-3 different diesel products typically available at my local stations:

1. Fuel Oil #1: Premium-grade, less prone to gel at low temps
2. Fuel Oil #2: Regular-grade, somewhat prone to gel at low temps
3. Winter Blend: Designed for winter use

And so, my question is this . . . how has this changed over the years? In other words, is the single type of diesel fuel that is now being made readily available at most commercial filling stations a blend of some sort? Or is it the equivalent of the older Fuel Oil #1? Basically, what gives nowadays?

Many thanks!
 

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you will likely be buying #2 and then it will be a blend for winter to help prevent Gelling

always good to add something to that if your going to be in freezing temps

#1 vs. #2 Diesel Fuel
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Excellent! Thanks Zmann.

That's a great link and it explained it all for me! Now, I just have to watch the dispensers for any added identifiers. Currently, at my local stations (Cenex, etc.), I'm not seeing anything that specifically identifies the available fuel as #2 or anything else. I guess I'll just go in and ask them what it is and when it is likely to change, etc.

But yes, regardless of what I learn, I have been (and will continue to) add Anti-Gel and Cetane booster to each full tank.
 

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Exploding the magma
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#1 fuel oil is kerosene, #2 is diesel fuel. Both are distillate type fuel oils. Kerosene is more refined than diesel, is more tolerate to cold but less energy dense than the heavier fuel oil. It also tends to lack the lubricating properties of even ULSD. Ultra low sulfur diesel (15ppm) came online in 2006-2007 and is now the standard in the US. Fuel oils 4-6 are considered bunker grade fuel and normally used in industrial applications such as power plants, container ships engines, etc. Heating oil is basically the same thing as diesel fuel.


Fuel Oil
 
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