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blame the dog..
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Discussion Starter #1
I know these have all probably been discussed before...
I figured I'd throw my .02 in and see how far behind the curve I really am..
safe from hydrogen fuel cells or wood-gas generators...

synthetic driveline fluids..
differentials, transfer case & transmission... reduction of drag due to low temp. viscosity

low-drag tires (inflated properly)...
rib or hi-way tires vs Pro-Comps or Terra Grapplers.. again, reduction of drag

air filter modifications.. Zoodad, cold air, Tymar or "6637" intakes make the turbo sound busier.. do they really increase fuel economy?

big diameter exhausts... do they really increase flow? does flow really increase economy? seems that the choke points would be the exhaust manifolds and turbocharger? how about DPFs?

intake modifications.. AIH delete, EBPV gut... doesn't bother the southern boys, but during certian times of the year up here, not really a smart play...
 

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Some answers from what i've found.

Hydrogen-generators take more energy to make hydrogen than what you will get back from them.

Synthetic fluids, motor oil, power steering fluid, ATF, rear axle lube: they last a long time but offer no measureable improvement in MPG.

Low rolling resistance tires do help. Not much data on just which ones are low rolling resistance. A green outfit did test a few tires in our size range and found the BFG Long Trail to be the best with the Michilin XP rib right behind. That data is seven years old, though. I do think the OEM Firebombs are pretty good. One surrogate paramenter for rolling resistance is noise. Quiet tires seem to have lower rolling resistance. The Firebombs are quiet and you can fearlessly over-inflate them.

Free-flowing intake and exhausts do not measureably help MPG.

Disconnecting the EBPV does appreciably help winter MPG but it now takes about 10 miles for the engine to warm up enough to run the heater.

What works:
Aerodynamic mods.
Gearing changes.
Adjusting the nut behind the wheel (the driver).

Now, you are up to speed.
 

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blame the dog..
Joined
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1,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Some answers from what i've found.

Hydrogen-generators take more energy to make hydrogen than what you will get back from them.

Synthetic fluids, motor oil, power steering fluid, ATF, rear axle lube: they last a long time but offer no measureable improvement in MPG.

Low rolling resistance tires do help. Not much data on just which ones are low rolling resistance. A green outfit did test a few tires in our size range and found the BFG Long Trail to be the best with the Michilin XP rib right behind. That data is seven years old, though. I do think the OEM Firebombs are pretty good. One surrogate paramenter for rolling resistance is noise. Quiet tires seem to have lower rolling resistance. The Firebombs are quiet and you can fearlessly over-inflate them.

What works:
Aerodynamic mods.
Gearing changes.
Adjusting the nut behind the wheel (the driver).

Now, you are up to speed.
tire wise, I pulled off a very tired set of Goodyear Silent Armors and replaced them with Wrangler SR/A's (very similar to Michelin LTX)..
as with any new tire, the increase in tread flex over the same tire worn out generally produces a decrease in fuel economy, so I was pleased when it actually increased .25 mpg (but was it worth laying out just as much as a set of S/A's in the middle of winter? Hell, no. I chalk that up as one of my classic theory on paper does not equal results moments)

as far as the loose nut between the wheel & the seat, I've found that on the expressway, 62mph produces the best result in clean air, 65mph behind a semi (52ft box trailer) is managable. Don't follow too close, I get in just close enough for the wind to quit whistling across the CB antenna (mounted in the dead center of "X" drawn between opposite corners of opposit bumpers). I've watched the overhead lie-o-meter increase 2 full mpg on a 50 mile run..

also, with my truck outfitted with a chip (DPTuner) in economy mode, about 2,200 rpms is about all you wanna give it. Keep the smoke IN the tailpipe.

I have a hard time believing that 4x4 SuperD's are capable of anything much over about 25.. 2wd's maybe 30 (due to lower drag from the lack of all that BS front axle, lower body/hood lines and less weight to haul around)

tuning a gas motor for fuel economy I can do.. but with only two ways to alter how much fuel a diesel consumes (how much it gets and when it gets it), I'm a pure noob...

tell me about the snowplow on the red truck in your avatar.. sheet metal? UHMW plastic?

next time your AC goes on the frtiz, hit me up. I specialize in AC
 

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'Tain't a snow plow. It's a NASCAR-style air dam. Only mine is dead vertical because I don't need downforce (a half-ton of engine keeps the front wheels down A-OK). The idea is to keep high-velocity air away from the rough undercarraige (potentially the draggiest part of the vehicle). No air flow, no drag. The material is rip-stop conveyor belting. It is virtually indestructible to road debris, so I could get very aggressive about tight ground clearance.

It does get removed when the snow flies.
 

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blame the dog..
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1,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
'Tain't a snow plow. It's a NASCAR-style air dam. Only mine is dead vertical because I don't need downforce (a half-ton of engine keeps the front wheels down A-OK). The idea is to keep high-velocity air away from the rough undercarraige (potentially the draggiest part of the vehicle). No air flow, no drag. The material is rip-stop conveyor belting. It is virtually indestructible to road debris, so I could get very aggressive about tight ground clearance.

It does get removed when the snow flies.
I almost called it a front splitter... but I don't know your feelings on the Crap ...uhh, CAR of Tomorrow

did you skirt the sides as well?
nevermind, I just saw the thread...
 
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