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Discussion Starter #1
My 95 f250 has a homemade flatbed on it that came with the truck. I like the bed but the mounting brackets on it literally make it set 6inches above the frame and it looks well crappy. I would like to lower it down closer to the frame but not sure how to attach it to the frame. Can I make mounting tabs on the bed and use the original factory bed mounting holes on theframe and bolt it directly to the truck? There is no 5th wheel or anything on the bed but I worry about making the frame to rigid with the bed bolted to the frame.
 

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My dad has an 84 F250 with a flatbed. He mounted the bed directly to the frame using the factory bed bolt holes on top of the frame. It's a farm truck so it's been used in the pasture, going through waterways, ditches corn stalk fields, ect. The trucks got 270,000 miles and the flat bed has been on there for the last 170,000 miles. No problems what so ever. It has a gooseneck ball and we have used it as well. Absolutely no issues.........
 

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Typically flat beds are mounted to the truck frame by either U-bolts or threaded rods and plates. They clamp the bed to the truck frame
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok I have ben doing some looking on my bed and think I can basically make a frame work to bolt to my frame then weld to the flatbed and this will bring it down at least 4 inches. Can I run cross members from side to side on the frame to bolt down like the factory bed was or do I need to run my channel from front front to back on the frame? Which way would put less stress on the frame? I dont offroad or anything with my truck so I wont the be flexing the frame much but id rather be safe than sorry.
 

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Ours is ran from side to side. diesel brad is correct, many people do use u-bolts to clamp flat beds down. However, like I said ours has had crossmembers running from side to side that are bolted directly to the frame where the factory bed bolts went. It's been on there for 170,000 miles plus........zero issues what so ever. I mean we haven't been jumping ditches and beating the tar out of it, but it's a farm truck so lots of flexing with trailers on back or 2,000 plus pounds of seed corn on the flatbed. One key thing to remember is you don't want to just throw some mounting brackets together. Make sure they have a good wide "foot print" that rests on the frame, not all the pressure in one spot. Also not a bad idea to make a bracket or plate for the back side of the frame so that all the stress is not in a couple tiny areas, that could possibly cause the frame to crack. Just a couple ideas
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok what im going to do is get some box tubing either square or rectangular to go from one side of the frame to the other and let it hang over the outside of the frame 4 or 5 inches per side. I will bolt the box beam to the orginal bed mount holes then
I will weld my flatbed to the new cross beams and that will bring it back down alot. Does anyone happen to know how big a box beam I will need to get the bed over the axle hump in the frame? I was thinking of going with 3inch but I will have to double check the frame height. Would it be stronger to go with square box beam or use rectangular box?
 

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I am not fan of tubing. It holds dirt/salt and you can't paint the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Would it be better to go with some good size c channel? Or maybe even some angle iron. My bed is a homemade bed and they built it alittle different, the entire frame work is made out of 3 or 3 and a half inch angle iron thats very thick. But they didnt build it with a beam running down each frame rail. It dosen't give at all and its very heavy I just have never seen a bed built like this. On the other hand though not having beams running down the frame rails is making it tricky to mount solid.
 

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You could use, c channel, or angle if you want. Or if you want to use box tubing, just weld the ends shut with some flat stock and weld the bolt where it comes out of the square tubing. Then you can just set it on the frame. If all the holes are welded shut and you can't get any oxygen in there it will never rust out. Or at least it will rust from the outside in long before it will ever rust from the inside out. Of course you want to start with a nice fresh piece that isn't already all rusted up on the inside.
 
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