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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Old Dog, New Tricks – Intercooler R&D, Post 1: A Core Review

Everything about Ford’s Super Duty Powerstroke brand screams, well, Super Duty. It has done so since they were first put in the Econoline Vans in the mid ‘90’s. Our 2011 is equipped with the 6.7L turbodiesel V8 engine, and it’s clear Ford has engineers who really took the Super Duty term to heart. There are two batteries, two radiators, two thermostats, two coolant expansion tanks, an engine oil cooler, a transmission oil cooler, an EGR cooler – this truck even has a fuel cooler. Just looking at the engine bay of this monster can be a bit daunting, especially to a guy used to dealing with smaller, beat up, four-cylinder engines. Fortunately, our engineers are well-versed in the nuances of this truck, as we already have many items out on the market for this application including a full charge pipe kit and both upgraded secondary and primary radiators.



One component we have yet to tackle is the intercooler, or the charge air cooler (CAC) as it’s referred to by some in the big-displacement truck communities. This isn’t your run-of-the-mill intercooler. It handles heat transfer in a different fashion than what we are used to seeing. Most intercoolers are designed to be air-to-air heat exchangers, relying on incoming airflow to cool the air going to the engine. But this intercooler uses what is called a water-to-air design.

From Water to Air



A water-to-air intercooler is where a heat exchanger uses water to absorb the heat coming from your turbo or supercharger and expel it into the atmosphere. The water is cooled using a secondary, external radiator, and is continuously cycled through this system with the use of a pump. While the coolant and air don’t actually make contact, the heat transfer is extremely efficient and in many ways superior to the typical air-to-air type setup.



There are a lot of benefits to using a water to air setup. The intercooler cores are generally much smaller, saving weight and allowing for creative mounting options. This also means less piping is required, which offers reduced turbo lag and getting the turbo or supercharger to peak boost faster. You can even supplement these parts with ice or other specialized cooling agents to produce temperatures that would be almost impossible with even the best front-mount air to air design. So why don’t most cars use this type of intercooler?

A setup like this is generally saved for heavy-duty applications like high-performance drag racing or those in need of quick yet significant bursts of power. It requires several extra accessories to work properly, advancing its complexity and widening the opportunity for issues like leaks (water and/or boost) if done poorly. Regardless of the complications involved, there are still vehicles with water-to-air intercooler setups. Both the Mercedes-Benz CLA45 AMG and BMW’s M3/M4 have one as a factory part.



These setups aren’t only found on modern applications either. While there is a lot of time and work that goes into creating a water-to-air intercooler setup for your boosted application, it has been done. Just don’t go looking for a direct-fit kit for your project car that uses a factory air-to-air setup. You’d be hard-pressed to find one. My buddy, who competes in Pro-am drifting, has used a water to air intercooler on his 1992 Nissan 240SX. At the time, it was swapped with a heavily-tuned SR20DET engine (he’s got an even cooler build now, check out his page @fedoraslide). He had to source, design, and fabricate the intercooler hose routing, secondary radiator mounting and brackets, source the correct pump, etc. It was a unique and efficient setup, you just don’t see many drift cars with complex cooling systems, even at his level. The car wasn’t entirely put together when the shot below was taken, it’s just to give you an idea.



Ford’s Special Cooler; And Our Plans For It

This turbodiesel 6.7L Powerstroke is no stranger to water-to-air intercoolers. These trucks have had this type of intercooler since their introduction to the market in 2011, but it didn’t come without its flaws. A truck with such redundant yet necessary engine protection only means one thing – they were made to be workhorses. A lot of the 6.7L Powerstrokes on the road are work and fleet trucks, which means they need to be worked to the bone with, hopefully, minimal maintenance involved.



An in-depth inspection of this core is necessary to help decide our direction in making a better intercooler. The core is stacked with outer wall ridges to help separate the interior cooling passages. When making these, a dye stamps out the dents on the exterior of the core, while fins are stacked on the interior. A design like this is actually pretty strong, relatively cheap to make and easy to construct. We confirmed this by firing up our water jet to slice our brand-new $500 intercooler sample from Ford, in half.





You can see that the stacks are not very thick, only a few millimeters. They are easy fail points as their connections aren’t strong enough. This issue becomes serious when the engine is constantly exposed to high boost pressures, and gets even worse if high mileage starts to take its toll. These factory intercoolers will begin to separate and crack at the stacked seems, causing boost leaks Strength must then be a prerequisite for our design. We want our core to be as strong as possible, so cast end tanks will be incorporated in our final design.

While the bulk of the research part of this is finished, we still want to figure out a few more things and play with a couple design ideas before we continue. We are creating a bar-and-plate core design that we have never done before and the way to successful completion is through diligence. Stay tuned for the next update!



-Diamaan
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hey everybody,

It's been a while, but we finally have an update for this intercooler! Since Diamaan's last post, I've taken over the project, so feel free to let me know if you have any comments or questions.

Enjoy!

Old Dog, New Tricks – Intercooler R&D, Part 2: Plans & Prototypes



Tucked between the battery and the radiator, buried beneath a tangle of coolant hoses, lies the heart of the Ford Powerstroke 6.7L charge air cooling system. This chunk of aluminum, the air-to-water intercooler, is responsible for keeping your workhorse breathing easy.



When we looked at this project last, we outlined what makes air-to-water intercoolers different from your typical air-to-air intercooler and why they’re used in heavy-duty applications. We also took our waterjet cutter to our brand-new OEM intercooler to see what was going on beyond the bland exterior. Once we had evaluated the stock intercooler’s strong and weak points, we developed a clear way forward: develop a durable intercooler that will weather any punishment a blue-collar truck could face.

Such simple goals don’t always render simple solutions. But despite the complexities of thermodynamics and heat transfer inherent to an air-to-water intercooler, Jason knew what needed to be done.



Making a durable intercooler is something we’re good at. We’ve done it a thousand times and then a thousand more. Each time we must, quite literally, weigh our options. When designing an intercooler for a hot-hatch or sports car, we need to worry about handling and determine if the added durability and efficiency of a bar-and-plate intercooler is worth the extra weight. In cases like the 6.7, where low-speed towing power and longevity are paramount over weight savings, the benefits of a bar-and-plate core offset the added weight.


A shot down the side of the intercooler shows the edges of the stacked plates where they are brazed to each other.

The core isn’t the only weak point of the stock intercooler, however. As we learned in the last post, the entire intercooler is made up of twelve stacked plates, brazed together on their edges. While the core of the intercooler is where most of the heat transfer happens, these end tanks experience the most pressure under boost. With high boost pressure, it’s just a matter of time before the brazed ends of those plates become a million little failure points. To remedy this Jason decided to construct the end tanks from cast aluminum, with the inlet and outlet being CNC machined after casting for a perfect fit and seal. The end tanks will then be welded onto the core, making for an intercooler that’s able to withstand just about anything a turbocharger can throw at it.

Aside from being more durable than the stock unit, our intercooler also needs to flow well and cool the charge air efficiently. When it comes to intercoolers, bigger is not always better. Between pressure drop and decreasing efficiency as the core thickens, air-to-air intercoolers often require balance to provide the best cooling performance. Air-to-water intercoolers, on the other hand, are inherently more efficient than their air-to-air counterparts and a compact design can yield great performance. Nevertheless, Jason searched for a way to increase the intercooler’s volume and maximize the space available.



Looking down into the engine bay, it’s hard to imagine squeezing anything larger than the stock intercooler underneath all the coolant hoses and lines. But, never one to be limited by the narrow view of the stock system, Jason came up with a clever way to utilize the free space around the intercooler.



The biggest obstacle he faced was the coolant hose for the primary radiator, which runs directly over the stock intercooler. With no way to move the hose and nowhere to shift the intercooler around the hose, Jason had no choice but to design around it, literally. Incorporating the shape of the hose into the top end tank allowed Jason to increase the volume of the intercooler while keeping the hose safely in place.



With our goals laid out and a plan to achieve them, Jason began by creating a 3D model using manufacturer data and measurements he had taken from the stock intercooler. After adding his tweaks to the OEM design, Jason sent his model over to the 3D printer to have end tanks printed. At the same time, our fabricator, Mike, welded together some aluminum stock to fill in for our future bar-and-plate core.



A quick test fit of our 3D-printed and aluminum prototype confirmed that this design could be squeezed into the confines of the 6.7’s engine bay well enough. But of course, leaving well enough alone is not what we do at Mishimoto, so Jason made a few more design adjustments, giving the intercooler sharp, clean lines and providing more clearance for the battery and hoses. The result of all this painstaking design is a tough, efficient intercooler that will out-last the stock intercooler without question.



With the prototype designed and test-fit, the next step is to send the drawings over to manufacturing for sampling. Soon, we’ll have our first air-to-water intercooler in our hands.


Thanks for reading,

-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey everybody,

It's been a while, but we're still working on this project! Check out the latest update below!


Old Dog, New Tricks – Intercooler R&D, Part 3: Flow Bench



Intercooler design is a delicate balance of pressure and flow. Too much flow means that the charge air does not stay in the core long enough to transfer heat. Too little flow, and too much pressure, means all the work your turbo or supercharger has been doing is wasted on forcing the air through the cooler instead of into the cylinders. Heat transfer happens rapidly inside an intercooler, so it’s difficult to make an intercooler core that has good flow. That doesn’t mean we could use just any core in our 2011-2017 6.7L Powerstroke intercooler. Like all our products, this intercooler needed to be extensively tested before it finds its way into our customers’ trucks.

In our last post, we looked at our prototype with its 3D-printed end tanks and aluminum bar core. In this post, we’ll test real cores with production end tanks to get the most accurate results.



After a few weeks of casting and making small tweaks to the designs of the four end tanks, we had a design that our engineer was happy with. With the end tanks cast, we needed a core to go between them. This is where our testing would become vital. Because this intercooler is an air-to-water cooler, our engineer was essentially developing two cores. Water and air are both considered fluids in physics , but they behave very differently as they move through a space. They also transfer heat differently. This meant that the design for the air side of the core needed to be different than the water side of the core.

The effectiveness of an intercooler core depends on an array of factors. The arrangement of cooling fins, the height of the tubes, core dimensions, and path the fluid takes, all play major roles. For each core, these factors are multiplied by two – once for the fluid to be cooled and once for the fluid receiving that heat.



In an air-to-air cooler, these two sides can be the same or at least very similar. In an air-to-water cooler, much like a radiator, each must be treated with its specific fluid in mind. Unlike radiator development, this intercooler would require striking that balance of flow and pressure on both sides of the core. For the charge-air side, we turned to our flow bench to find the best flowing core features. We welded our cast end tanks to our core candidates and got to work on the flow bench. After testing multiple variations of fins and tubes, we compared the data between them and the stock cooler.


Before we look at the results, we should talk about how the flow bench works and how flow is calculated. But even before that, we must explain one important concept: pressure is the measure of restriction and flow is the lack of pressure. If you blow into open air, it’s easy and you can flow as much air as your body can produce. If you try to blow through a tiny straw at the same rate, you’ve introduced a restriction in flow and increased the amount of pressure required to flow the same amount of air.



A flow bench test factors in two main values: pressure and flow rate (measured in cubic-feet per minute, or CFM). Even though we’re looking for the best flowing core, we’re not just looking at the CFM figures. What really matters in flow bench testing is the pressure drop across the part at a pre-set CFM. Inside the flow bench is essentially a powerful vacuum that draws air in at known rates of flow. The machine then measures the amount of pressure needed to pull that much air through the part. With that pressure, we can calculate the pressure drop across the core and thus how restrictive the core is.

A lower drop in pressure across the core indicates that less pressure is needed to move air at that flow-rate. A lower pressure drop, at the same or higher CFM, indicates a freer flowing core. So how did our best core compare to the stock core?



At 600 CFM, our best core showed a 22% lower pressure drop than the stock cooler. Put simply, our core flows 22% better than the stock cooler. That extra flow will let your 6.7L Powerstroke pull in more air, inject more fuel, and make more power. With flow bench testing complete, we’ll soon have a production sample to fit in the truck and soon after that a pre-sale so that you can have one in yours too. Keep an eye out for the next update on this project and feel free to let us know what you think.

Thanks for reading!
-Steve
 

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Thanks for sharing your info, very cool, indeed. Question as I’m not familiar with the 6.7, just thinking retrofit into ‘97 OBS 7.3. The cooling fluid into your water to air system is it separate from the engine antifreeze system? And if yes how big is the radiator cooler and does it have an electric fan set up on it?

thanks again,

j
 

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I would strongly recommend getting a prototype unit into a hot tuned 15+ truck and pulling a decently heavy trailer in hot weather, before it is released.

There is a limit to the amount of heat the secondary coolant system can dissipate. It's a great dissapointment getting charge air temps out of hand...
 

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Thanks for sharing your info, very cool, indeed. Question as I’m not familiar with the 6.7, just thinking retrofit into ‘97 OBS 7.3. The cooling fluid into your water to air system is it separate from the engine antifreeze system? And if yes how big is the radiator cooler and does it have an electric fan set up on it?

thanks again,

j
Yes, the cooling system for the intercooler is separate from the engine cooling system and utilizes its own radiator. Cooling for the intercooler is shared with the EGR cooler, trans cooler and fuel cooler and is cooled by the factory secondary radiator. We make an upgrade for the secondary rad and have more info on it here: https://www.mishimoto.com/engineeri...iator-rd-part-1-factory-review-and-3d-models/

The stock secondary radiator is 39"H x 21"W x 1.5" thick.

I would strongly recommend getting a prototype unit into a hot tuned 15+ truck and pulling a decently heavy trailer in hot weather, before it is released.

There is a limit to the amount of heat the secondary coolant system can dissipate. It's a great dissapointment getting charge air temps out of hand...
Thanks for the suggestion, I'll pass it on to the team!

-Steve
 

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Yes, the cooling system for the intercooler is separate from the engine cooling system and utilizes its own radiator. Cooling for the intercooler is shared with the EGR cooler, trans cooler and fuel cooler and is cooled by the factory secondary radiator. We make an upgrade for the secondary rad and have more info on it here: https://www.mishimoto.com/engineeri...iator-rd-part-1-factory-review-and-3d-models/

The stock secondary radiator is 39"H x 21"W x 1.5" thick


Thanks for the suggestion, I'll pass it on to the team!

-Steve
Thanks for the info Steve, so is the H2O to air system more efficient at cooling the air charge then the 7.3 air to air cooler? Just chewing on what I might rig up for my OBS 7.3. It’s a low miler that’s gonna get some upgrades and will be needing some sort of aftercooler.
Thanks again.
j
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info Steve, so is the H2O to air system more efficient at cooling the air charge then the 7.3 air to air cooler? Just chewing on what I might rig up for my OBS 7.3. It’s a low miler that’s gonna get some upgrades and will be needing some sort of aftercooler.
Thanks again.
j
That's going to depend on how cool you can keep your coolant. Coolant has a significantly higher thermal capacity than air, but if your coolant has to cool your engine, oil, fuel, transmission, and charge air, you might be better off with a traditional air-to-air cooler. Given that the 6.7L has a secondary radiator system primarily for the intercooler, I would venture to say that air-to-air might be better for your setup.

Thanks!

-Steve
 

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That's going to depend on how cool you can keep your coolant. Coolant has a significantly higher thermal capacity than air, but if your coolant has to cool your engine, oil, fuel, transmission, and charge air, you might be better off with a traditional air-to-air cooler. Given that the 6.7L has a secondary radiator system primarily for the intercooler, I would venture to say that air-to-air might be better for your setup.

Thanks!

-Steve

Should have noted that I would include a second cooler system similar to 6.7s and at this point trying to determine if I’d get more efficient cooling from 6.7ish system or SD 7.3 air to air. Are the thermostats ecm controlled or mechanical within the secondary radiator? I see possibly benefits from H20 to air as the radiator is thinner than a 7.3 cooler potentially less charge air piping (less lag), less boots to blow off. If more efficient then in theory perhaps more power and better fuel economy too. Lastly is there an e pump on the secondary coolant system?
Thanks,
j
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Should have noted that I would include a second cooler system similar to 6.7s and at this point trying to determine if I’d get more efficient cooling from 6.7ish system or SD 7.3 air to air. Are the thermostats ecm controlled or mechanical within the secondary radiator? I see possibly benefits from H20 to air as the radiator is thinner than a 7.3 cooler potentially less charge air piping (less lag), less boots to blow off. If more efficient then in theory perhaps more power and better fuel economy too. Lastly is there an e pump on the secondary coolant system?
Thanks,
j
I'm no expert on the 7.3L FI systems, so I'm probably not the best source of advise on this topic. But, I can say that between the 6.7 secondary rad and the 7.3L intercooler, there isn't a huge size difference and the air passing through the intercooler is probably going to be a little cooler than the air passing through a radiator. Plus, with adding in a secondary cooling system, you're going to have to worry about plumbing the system and mounting the cooler, secondary rad, pump and reservoir on a vehicle that wasn't designed for them. The pump for the 6.7L secondary cooling system is belt driven and the thermostats are mechanical and housed in the secondary radiator. The main benefit of an air-to-water intercooler is that you get the same efficiency out of a smaller package, but in this case the benefits would probably be negated by adding in all of the necessary components.

Thanks!
-Steve
 

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Thanks Steve, much appreciated.
j
 

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Hey everybody,

Just a small update on some leak testing that we performed on a stock intercooler with some interesting results. Check it out and let us know what you think!

Old Dog, New Tricks – Intercooler R&D, Part 4: Strong by Design



It wasn’t too long ago that we saw our 2011-2017 Ford Powerstroke 6.7L air-to-water intercooler on the flow bench. We talked about flow rates, and pressure drop, and learned that our intercooler flows air about 22% better than the stock cooler. Soon, we’ll see how that increased flow translates into power on the Dynapacks. But first, I wanted to circle back to our original goal for this project: make the intercooler stronger.

We started this project over a year ago after finding reports of owners and shops chasing disappearing coolant. Further inspection would show that the stock intercoolers were leaking internally, and the coolant was making its way into the engine. While we didn’t see a massive amount of these cases, there were enough reports for us to investigate further. After looking at our own 6.7L shop truck, we determined that we could make a stronger intercooler with a bar-and-plate core and cast end-tanks. We were also confident that the truck would make more power with our intercooler.



After a few weeks of talking with the shop who originally shared the information about leaking intercoolers with us, we decided to get one into our facility to see exactly what was going on. We asked the shop to send over one of the several intercoolers they replace every year and waited patiently.

Once the leaking intercooler arrived, we hooked the coolant ports up to our compressor, pumped in a few PSI of air pressure, submerged it in water, and watched. At first, it was hard to see anything happening. But, after repositioning the intercooler, the bubbles started to flow. Slowly.


We couldn’t see where the bubbles were coming from due to the tightly stacked plates, but we could tell that the hole in the coolant passage was very small. One bubble would rise to the surface every few seconds, leading us to believe that the leak was a pin-hole in the brazing between the two passages. If this were a coolant leak, you probably wouldn’t notice it until the level in the reservoir dropped low enough. It’s unlikely that even pulling the intercooler off would reveal the leak, as most of the coolant would burn off before it had a chance to pool and create a wet spot.



So, is your intercooler going to rupture in an explosion of boost and coolant? Probably not. But, if you’ve been noticing higher intake charge temps or your secondary coolant reservoir has been emptying with no outward signs of a leak, you might want to give your intercooler a closer look.



Where the stock 6.7L intercooler uses a stacked-plate construction, our intercooler will utilize a stronger bar-and-plate core. This core will be more durable and resistant to the expansion and contraction caused by constant temperature changes. And, our end tanks will be cast aluminum and TIG welded to the core, instead of being built into the core. All of this will make for a bullet-proof intercooler that will hold up even under extreme boost pressures.

Stay tuned for our next post, where we’ll see how our stronger intercooler performs on the Dynapacks. As always, feel free to leave any comments or questions you may have.

Thanks for reading!
-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey everybody,

Here's the next update on our 6.7L air-to-water intercooler. Check it out!

Old Dog, New Tricks – Intercooler R&D, Part 5: Dyno



Power feels different for everybody. For some, it’s the feel of freshly printed money. For others, power feels like the blinding camera flashes of paparazzi. But for many automotive enthusiasts, true power is the shove you feel in your back as you push your right foot to the floor.

The enthusiast’s quest for power can be never ending (just ask the participants of TX2K) and Mishimoto has been working on an air-to-water intercooler for the 2011-2016 Ford 6.7L Powerstroke to aid in that journey. We’ve looked at the stock 6.7L intercooler’s faults in depth and followed the development of our stronger, https://www.mishimoto.com/engineering/2018/08/ford-powerstroke-2011-2017-67l-intercooler-rd-pt3/ replacement; now it’s time to put it to the test on the dyno.



Before we dive into the dyno testing, let’s first recap what brought us here. In short, our goal for this project was to create a stronger intercooler that flowed better than stock. The first half of that goal was accomplished by casting the coolant and air end tanks, then TIG welding them to our bar-and-plate core. That core was designed specifically to out-flow the stock air-to-water intercooler, while maintaining efficient cooling. Flow bench testing proved that our core flowed over 20% better than the stock, but the flow bench can only tell us so much. With economy-driven ECU tunes and multiple systems interacting on the vehicle, how that 20% increase in flow actually affects performance was yet to be seen.



That brings us to our first round of dyno testing. Whenever we test a product, especially one that is intended to make power, we begin by testing on the most stock vehicle we can get a hold of. This allows us to directly compare our product to stock without worrying about tunes or other modifications skewing the results. In the case of the 6.7L intercooler, we were lucky enough that one of our shop vehicles is a 2011 6.7L. Once our production sample was ready, we installed it on our 6.7L and bolted it up to our Dynapacks. The project engineer did a few light pulls to get the truck up to temp and then started on the power runs. After giving each intercooler ample opportunity to prove itself, we shut the dyno down and analyzed the results.



Given the greater flow of our intercooler, we expected to see some improvement in torque, but we were happy to see a large gap between the lines once the dyno graphs were laid side-by-side. At around 1,750 RPM to about 2,000 RPM, our intercooler allowed the 6.7L to make over 40 lb. ft. more torque than the stock intercooler.



A 40 lb. ft. gain on a stock 6.7L was impressive, but we wanted to take it one step further. We know many of our customers have a bit more than nothing done to their 6.7L, so we wanted to test this intercooler on a truck that was a little closer to what you all will be driving. To show you how well our intercooler performed with a little help from some supporting mods, I’ll let our engineer and head of innovation take over:


With dyno testing complete, the next stop for this intercooler is a pre-sale. Keep an eye out for that and feel free to share any questions or comments you may have. As always, thanks for reading!

-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey everybody,

Good news, the pre-sale for this intercooler is now live! We're offering the intercooler alone for 2011-2016 6.7L's as well as a kit for a kit for the 2017+ that includes the cold-side pipe and a kit for all 2011+ that includes both hot-side and cold-side pipes.

Check them out below and let me know if you have any questions!


Mishimoto 2011-2016 Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Air-to-Water Intercooler Pre-Sale

Sale Price: $993.95



Mishimoto 2011+ Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Air-to-Water Intercooler Kit Pre-Sale

Sale Price: $1,465.95



Mishimoto 2017+ Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Air-to-Water Intercooler Kit Pre-Sale

Sale Price: $1,465.95



Thanks!
-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hey everybody,

I just wanted to let you all know that we will be pushing this release date back by a couple weeks due to the holidays and some warehouse maintenance. We're currently shooting for the second week in January to begin shipping these.

I apologize for the delay, please feel free to let us know if you have any questions.

Thanks,
-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hey everybody,

Just wanted to give you a heads-up that we'll be ending the pre-sale for these tomorrow and orders should be shipping out shortly after. This will be your last chance to get this intercooler at the pre-sale price!

Thanks,

-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi everybody,

The pre-sale for this intercooler is now over. Thank you to everybody who ordered, you should be receiving shipment notifications next week!

If you missed the pre-sale, be sure to keep an eye out on our websites and our distributor's sites for great deals on our 2011+ intercooler.

Thanks again,

-Steve
 
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