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brandon
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Does anyone know how much an intake helps mpg? afe, tymar, do it your self tymar, or any type other than a k&n, don't want on of those. any suggestions?:D
 

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They help very little with MPG, like less than 1 mpg. In terms of MPG any of the aftermarket stuff is going to be the same as the next. Theoretically ones that remain a cold air intake would have an advantage over the open element in the engine compartment.
 

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i'd say less than 1/2 mpg. it will however help more when towing or driving heavy in my experience.
towing 7-8k in firewood, I was running about 13.5-14 mpg... after the intake, I was seeing more like 15.2-15.5, same path, same speed, similar temps and humidity... etc etc.
 

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i'd say less than 1/2 mpg. it will however help more when towing or driving heavy in my experience.
towing 7-8k in firewood, I was running about 13.5-14 mpg... after the intake, I was seeing more like 15.2-15.5, same path, same speed, similar temps and humidity... etc etc.
That's interesting. Do you have a log that you keep to substantiate your towing results?
 

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That's interesting. Do you have a log that you keep to substantiate your towing results?
It wasn't very consistent (my input) at that time, but yes. Three trips entered before, two after with the intake only.
May also make a difference that the majority of the hard pulls on the route are at 5000+ elevations.
 

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I put a Baldwin PA2818 on my truck and got ZERO improvement in MPG. I think trying to improve MPG by freeing up either intake or exhaust is just gas engine thinking.

You got a diesel. Think like a diesel.
 

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brandon
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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the input
 

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Junior Mint
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The difference would be small if you work the truck hard and non existant if you don't.

Hot air intakes get better mpg than cold air intakes. Has to do w/ lower vaporization temps or something.
 

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I put a Baldwin PA2818 on my truck and got ZERO improvement in MPG. I think trying to improve MPG by freeing up either intake or exhaust is just gas engine thinking.

You got a diesel. Think like a diesel.
I think you are correct. After I had my intake exhaust for a while, I learned that there is no difference in mpg. The chip gave me between .5 to 1.5 mpg in the city depending on driving conditions. Highway driving made no difference with the chip or without the chip. Its the placebo effect when you first get the stuff, but eventually you wake up.
 

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Old guy from the old days
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This is the text of the thread I started on another site when I did the open element intake in August of 2001. Mileage did not change measurably (less than .5 MPG gain on an otherwise stock truck). As noted, in my opinion the open element filter by itself does not make a lot of difference but with other mods it helps things to work better (sometimes MUCH better).

I did the open air filter mod today. I got base line times for the stock air filter and did times for the open filter this afternoon.

Truck: 1995 F-250 Power Stroke 5 speed extended cab long bed, 3:55 gears, aluminum cab height bed cap, 235/85 x 16 steer tires, 255/85 x 16 drive tires

All measurements on level road with A/C off.
All times are an average of four separate runs
3 - 55 mph was starting at idle, clutch engaged in first gear (did not want to trash my new $1,400 clutch), shift points 3100 rpm.

Mileage figures are for unloaded driving, moderate acceleration (shift points 16 - 1800
rpm, ¼ - ½ throttle) using #2 Marathon diesel. Base line MPG is over 4-5000 miles, MPG after modification is for a load of fuel, 400+ miles and will be reported next week some time. Mileages calculated mathematically. I don't have a trip computer and would not trust it if I did.

Base line performance, no modifications.

55 - 75 mph top gear roll on .... 12.04 sec

3 - 55 mph ...................... 13.25 sec

MPG ............................. 19.2

After installing Napa open element air filter with 4" exhaust pipe adapter in place of factory air filter assembly (times measured as above):

55 - 75 mph top gear roll on ...... 12.15

3 - 55 mph ........................ 13.40

MPG To be reported in a week or so.

What this tells me is there is no discernible difference before and after this modification on an otherwise stock engine. My gut feeling is the factory downpipe is the restriction in air flow and the air filter would make a difference with an aftermarket downpipe. Turbo whine is not noticeably louder, there is a little more intake rumble though any time I am over 1/4 throttle.
Dave / Believer45
 

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<-- it's like that
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If you are really driving for mileage, then you aren't even close to using the full capacity of the stock intake. The stock intake becomes a restriction when you add power and really use that power. But once your foot is deep into the pedal, you aren't driving for mileage anymore.
 

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Old guy from the old days
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I agree with Pocket and the measurements I posted earlier in this thread seem to bear this out.

I made a concerted effort to drive for mileage, went to websites that promote hypermiling (techniques with regard to MPG only, no concern for anything else) and have applied some of them to my daily driving. This had more of an effect than any modifications I have seen reported or experienced.

Slowing my truck down:

75 mph = 17.5 or so, 65 mph = 18.7, 55 mph = 20.5.

Friend's 2006 Chevy gasser slowing down from 75/80 to 60 netted just under 7 mpg gain on the interstate (17.5 - 24.3). I was driving, measurements were at least 400 miles at each speed and calculated by hand and done on a single trip so load and such was the same.

Drive like you have a full aquarium in the bed sitting on $5000 per square yard carpet (no spills) netted @ 1.4 mpg gain. Synthetic oil seems to have netted 2.5 mpg gain on the interstate, I just did this one so I am not sure how it will affect city mileage. Cold starts are much easier now (Shell Rotella T 5W-40 full synthetic).

How you drive will improve your MPG more than anything you can do to your truck without going to extremes (ie 3.08 gears in my F250, overdrive units, etc.) plus all it costs is some time as you slow down.

Dave / Believer45
 

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brandon
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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for all of the info
 

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If you are really driving for mileage, then you aren't even close to using the full capacity of the stock intake. The stock intake becomes a restriction when you add power and really use that power. But once your foot is deep into the pedal, you aren't driving for mileage anymore.
Unless you like to try for mileage while towing or hauling... :poke:
 

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I agree with Pocket and the measurements I posted earlier in this thread seem to bear this out.

I made a concerted effort to drive for mileage, went to websites that promote hypermiling (techniques with regard to MPG only, no concern for anything else) and have applied some of them to my daily driving. This had more of an effect than any modifications I have seen reported or experienced.

Slowing my truck down:

75 mph = 17.5 or so, 65 mph = 18.7, 55 mph = 20.5.

Friend's 2006 Chevy gasser slowing down from 75/80 to 60 netted just under 7 mpg gain on the interstate (17.5 - 24.3). I was driving, measurements were at least 400 miles at each speed and calculated by hand and done on a single trip so load and such was the same.

Drive like you have a full aquarium in the bed sitting on $5000 per square yard carpet (no spills) netted @ 1.4 mpg gain. Synthetic oil seems to have netted 2.5 mpg gain on the interstate, I just did this one so I am not sure how it will affect city mileage. Cold starts are much easier now (Shell Rotella T 5W-40 full synthetic).

How you drive will improve your MPG more than anything you can do to your truck without going to extremes (ie 3.08 gears in my F250, overdrive units, etc.) plus all it costs is some time as you slow down.

Dave / Believer45
that much difference?
 

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Old guy from the old days
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that much difference?
Figures are accurate, calculated mathematically, each one at least one full tank of fuel (or gasoline depending on which truck).

Yes a combination of slowing down and keeping your foot out of the go pedal makes that much difference.

Dave / Believer45
 

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however my 08 may already have synthetic?
 

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Old guy from the old days
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that much difference?
I just noticed the highlight on the synthetic oil - I only have one tank of fuel running highway on the synthetic. Again, figures were calculated mathematically, ran fuel in both tanks until it stopped twice. I ran just over 400 miles on the front tank before switching to the rear so I knew something was going VERY well. I will be going to Cleveland again Wednesday and will check again.

I have run another fill-up 100% city driving but have not filled up yet (will do so later today) so I do not know what surface road mileage is.

As for your truck coming from the factory with synthetic oil, I do not know what factory spec is. You would have to contact Ford or whoever did the last oil change if it has been changed. My assumption would be if the owners manual has a spec for regular oil the factory probably used regular oil in it but it is just that, an assumption.

Dave / Believer45
 
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