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TennesseeHillbilly
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have a procedure for disassembly of a HPOP? I have a used one that I want to experiment with. I don't intend to start competing with the aftermarket vendors, just curious about a few things.
 

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Village Idiot
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8,209 Posts
check the library forum under 7.3 , there is an oem ford guide on hpops should have some diagrams etc..never had mine apart but the snap ring on the back will be a good start.

used ones are full of some pretty nasy oil so be ready with old towels etc
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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1,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I got the snap ring and back over off. The factory & all the service manuals say that it is not field serviceable but if sombody put it together, it can be taken apart.
I just didn't want to trash it in the process. I have anything I need to fabricate special tools but I thought that if someone else had done it already then it might save me some time.
Found THIS ARTICLE but not much in the way of procedure or detailed info. I guess the people who do it are kinda tight-lipped about it.
 

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What else?
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4,156 Posts
If you read the article it notes that the pump parts are pressed in and you have to make fixtures and tools to disassemble it.

Probably the easiest and fastest way to take it apart would be to stick it in a band saw and cut it in half. LOL

Dave
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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1,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
If you read the article it notes that the pump parts are pressed in and you have to make fixtures and tools to disassemble it.

Probably the easiest and fastest way to take it apart would be to stick it in a band saw and cut it in half. LOL

Dave
Dave, dam boy! Why didun I think uh that! :poke:
Really did think of that but this is a good one. I think it's a 17° so I might
swap it for my 15° and sacrifice it....??? Or......
I would be happy to saw yours in half.....?????......NO?......Oh well......thanks for the idea.:D
Whit
 

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PSN Pretender
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1,926 Posts
I tried once, couldn't get the damn thing apart. It is pressed together and without some sort of jig there is no way to do it without destroying it.
 

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Dave, dam boy! Why didun I think uh that! :poke:
Really did think of that but this is a good one. I think it's a 17° so I might
swap it for my 15° and sacrifice it....??? Or......
I would be happy to saw yours in half.....?????......NO?......Oh well......thanks for the idea.:D
Whit
Since you have the back cover its easy to tell. 15* has a bearing, 17* has a bushing
 

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As I am sure you know their are a lot of thing people are tight lipped about. I have taken a few apart in the past to swap swashplates in the 94.5-95 trucks and I had taken pics of disassembly and assembly. Unfortunately they were on my Dell laptop that crapped out on me a few months ago.

The swashplate is pressed in. It has been almost a year since I have done one so it is hard to remember exactly but here the basics.

First step is pull the shaft, front seal and rear plate and drop a bolt in with a couple washers on it that are big enough they will not slide threw the barrel. I actualy had to grind the washers to fit just right. Then I put a washer and nut on the end coming out of the swashplate and tighten it down to compress the barrel and plungers to the swashplate.

Then you use the head of the bolt to push the whole assembly out the back side of the pump. If you do not have a press to do this with you can drive it all out with a hammer and a punch. Driving it out will usually gauld the edge of the the center of the barrel where the shaft comes threw but it will not hurt anything so don't worry about it.

Then when you put it all back together you just do everything in reverse and the bolt will hold the plunger, barrel and swash plate all together for easy assembly. Just be sure you clock the swashplate properly.
 

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What else?
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4,156 Posts
Dave, dam boy! Why didun I think uh that! :poke:
Really did think of that but this is a good one. I think it's a 17° so I might
swap it for my 15° and sacrifice it....??? Or......
I would be happy to saw yours in half.....?????......NO?......Oh well......thanks for the idea.:D
Whit
You laugh, a friend of mine and I have thought about doing it, we just need a cheap pump. It would be a little messy though! :D

Dave
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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1,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
You laugh, a friend of mine and I have thought about doing it, we just need a cheap pump. It would be a little messy though! :D

Dave
Dave, just kidding!
If I had a junk one I had thought about just milling a slot
thru the housing to get a look inside. I bought this 17° pump to swap out for my the 15° on my early 99 so I really didn't want to trash it.
Somewhere along the line one may have to die in order to go thru the learning process.
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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1,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
As I am sure you know their are a lot of thing people are tight lipped about. I have taken a few apart in the past to swap swashplates in the 94.5-95 trucks and I had taken pics of disassembly and assembly. Unfortunately they were on my Dell laptop that crapped out on me a few months ago.

The swashplate is pressed in. It has been almost a year since I have done one so it is hard to remember exactly but here the basics.

First step is pull the shaft, front seal and rear plate and drop a bolt in with a couple washers on it that are big enough they will not slide threw the barrel. I actualy had to grind the washers to fit just right. Then I put a washer and nut on the end coming out of the swashplate and tighten it down to compress the barrel and plungers to the swashplate.

Then you use the head of the bolt to push the whole assembly out the back side of the pump. If you do not have a press to do this with you can drive it all out with a hammer and a punch. Driving it out will usually gauld the edge of the the center of the barrel where the shaft comes threw but it will not hurt anything so don't worry about it.

Then when you put it all back together you just do everything in reverse and the bolt will hold the plunger, barrel and swash plate all together for easy assembly. Just be sure you clock the swashplate properly.
Thanks for that info. It's a start. I'm in the machine shop business. We do high-precision CNC machining for several high end customers, so I really have no desire to jump into the high performance HPOP market. Several others are there already and it just isn't worth my time and effort.

But I am a tinkerer and a hobbyist and a DIY guy. I just enjoy taking sh!t apart to see how it works and how to easily(and cheaply) masssage it a bit and make it better.

These HPOPs are basically just a mass produced, run-of-the-mill piston pump. The manufacturing tolerences are fairly loose so that they are easy to produce in mass quantity. That's precisely why some trucks, stock, run so much better than others. One gets a pump that, by sheer accident, is fitted to much tighter tolerances and the next one gets a pump where the fits are loose. They both are in tolerance but don't perform the same at all.

I assume these guys that are modifying the stock pumps are installing new, custom machined components and they are machined and fitted to much more precise tolerances. One vendor, in fact, advertises this very point when he says
"EVERY A******* PUMP IS BUILT EXACTLY THE SAME. EACH PUMP IS TESTED BEFORE IT LEAVES HERE.
THERE IS ONLY ONE PUMP VERSION AND IF YOU ORDER AN A********* IT WILL BE BUILT TO THE SAME SPECS AS THE NEXT GUY."
This guys thoroughly understands the concept of precise tolerances.
He has to, he's telling two buddies that if they put his pump on both their trucks, all other thing being equal, that one isn't gonna smoke the other one's azz.

Another designer/vendor is machining an entirely new housing in order to install his design of modified components. Looks way cool but it's expensive when you start from scratch with a chunk of billet aluminum. I know, I manufacture parts every day! The material is expensive and so is the labor.
For me it's more of a curiosity thing. I would most likely just buy one if I was looking to do some mods on my truck.
Thanks Again,
Whit
 

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...Another designer/vendor is machining an entirely new housing in order to install his design of modified components. Looks way cool but it's expensive when you start from scratch with a chunk of billet aluminum. I know, I manufacture parts every day! The material is expensive and so is the labor.
That may be so, but for those of us that have had the pleasure of blowing the fittings out of the crappy stock housing know it's well worth the $$$ to go with a Billet unit.
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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1,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
That may be so, but for those of us that have had the pleasure of blowing the fittings out of the crappy stock housing know it's well worth the $$$ to go with a Billet unit.
Not bashing anybody's design whatsoever, just making a point that the aftermarket guys are INSURING that every one of their pumps is manufactured and assembled to very precise tolerences. And yes, that costs more. I don't have an issue at all with the prices because I am fully aware of what is involved in producing a quality product.

And yes, many of the stock pumps are crappy. That's exactly why some guys have trouble getting their trucks to run right especially as they begin to add mods to them.
It very obvious just by reading the hundreds of posts on this site alone that many of the stock pumps just won't perform but there are some that will. They simply aren't designed for anything more than a stock engine and are sometimes marginal even at that.
 
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