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User Error
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This is just kind of an idea I've played with over the past couple months. Eventually when I get a new daily driver my 01 PSD is gonna become my mud honey. But I was just thinking, what would it take to make this truck a 6x6? I've seen pictures of people who've undertaken the feat but not too many details. Obviously there would be some heavy duty frame modifications that would take place, but outside of the body work I feel like it's not too much more than some experienced welding, creative steel fabrication and use of some accurate laser alignment tools to mount the suspension components, obviously with very careful measurements all the way around. I'd make my own flatbed so bodywork shouldn't be an issue. But if you were gonna do this, what would you change as far as suspension and driveline? Leaf Springs to coilovers with four link? Stay with traditional leafs? 2.5 ton top loaders or a different axle? Would you have rear steering on the 3rd axle? Traditional wheel brakes or driveshaft brake? Stick with the stock fuel tank or move it to behind the cab? Would an attempt at making it streetable be worth the effort? Again this is just a thought, I'm just curious to what you guys would do if you were to take on a project like this.
 

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'05 Excursion
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Not that long ago saw a twin axle dually with both axles powered in a magazine. So would that make it a 6X6 or a 10X10??? LOL


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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Terminator Nation
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Google Chuck Chaplinski and Chuck Chaplinski ford. There's several writeups online in both DieselPower and DieselTech mag's websites.

DieselPower:
7/01/2006 2005 Ford F-350 6x6
12/01/2008 2008 Ford F-450 SuperDuty

Diesel Tech:
12/20/2012 Another Build?

I don't know how to link this stuff so Google is your friend.
 

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Village Idiot
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I saw a dodge called t rex that had good info aswell.
 

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Since there is no diff made with an output on the back of it to drive the 3rd axle, at least not in a reasonable size that I'm aware of, you will need two outputs out of the transfer case. I think that pretty much means a 205 case.

I used to have an old Dodge WW2 truck, I think it was a WC45 or WC47. It had this set up. And the predecessor to the 205.

Suspension equalization of the rear axles is a consideration too.
 

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Since there is no diff made with an output on the back of it to drive the 3rd axle, at least not in a reasonable size that I'm aware of, you will need two outputs out of the transfer case. I think that pretty much means a 205 case.

I used to have an old Dodge WW2 truck, I think it was a WC45 or WC47. It had this set up. And the predecessor to the 205.

Suspension equalization of the rear axles is a consideration too.
A Rock well 2 1/2 ton axle has it. they aren't TOO huge. They have a 6.71 gear ration stock I believe. IMO that would be your best option if you want to make a 6x6.
 

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Village Idiot
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Trex used rockwells iirc..a few monster trucks use them as well but put a 5th brake rotor on the output of the axel to help stop.
 

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Kris
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236 Posts
I think 2.5 Rockwells are the best, easiest and cheapest solution here. There's a nice gear reduction in the axles already so turning larger tires shouldn't be an issue.

Simple input/output's on the drivelines so you can set up as many or as few axles are you want.



They're pretty versatile as far as suspension goes. You can put whatever you want on it. My old set of rocks were leaf's, plenty of guys building buggies and trucks these days with coilovers/ four links. You can lose hundreds of pounds by stripping the stock brakes off of the axles and going with a pinion brake.



Whatever you decide to go with, you'd better take lots of pictures and post them up. ;)
 
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