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Discussion Starter #1
I've had my "new to me" 05' F250 for a few years now.....and the one thing I'm just not happy about is the braking power. I've went through and put all new calipers and rotors on it, new Wagner HD pads, new rubber lines to the calipers, flushed the brake fluid, and also powersteering/hydroboost fluid.......and although the brakes work ok, they just don't seem all that great. I know it's a 8,000lb truck...but I would have through they should be better than they are.

Could the Hydroboost unit and/or master cylinder need replaced? Or do they just go bad...and not really slowly wear out?

I know it's a 15yr old truck and it's not going to have as good of brakes as a new 2020......but I would just think they would be a little better. The brakes on my 04' Dodge Ram 1500 were much better than this truck.
 

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Only thing different from our old trucks and something new would be sizing of the brakes, and on a guess there shouldn't be much bigger on the new trucks.

I would think there is something going on with your truck or it's the wingnut behind the steering wheel.
 

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I just went through this myself, and there are a few threads on here about it. The only thing you can truly do is get larger rotors....which is going to require custom calipers, etc. They do make them, but they're thousands of dollars. You went the right route. The only thing I would say you didn't do was add stainless steel braided lines to reduce the swelling when braking, which increases available pressure. Other than that, yes, it's possible you have a hydroboost issue too. I took care of that with a thorough flush of the power steering system and a purge of all air. My Excursion brakes better now at 16 years old than my other Ex did at 3 years old. But you're never going to get sports car performance. Best addition you can give to any braking system is distance between you and the other vehicle. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To me the brakes just feel kind of spongey.....even after the new rubber lines and fresh fluid. I've flushed them multiple times, and there is no air in the system.
 

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You can swap 14' knuckles, hubs, and all the brakes over to get the same massive brakes the 14'+ trucks have. I did some pretty extensive research on this too, and that is the best option I came up with.

Although, this is only good if you have a properly working brake system to begin with.
 

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After doing some performance mods on my truck (06 350), my brakes gave me a couple of white knuckle experiences, mainly in town.
I immediately went with drilled and slotted rotors with ceramic pads. I did the proper break in procedure and my breaks are damn good now, better than my girlfriends Subaru. In fact, I have not had to use the full pedal since this upgrade.
I'll be going to braided lines and new calipers, along with a full fluid flush when this set wears out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Every time I've tried drilled and slotted rotors...I've been disappointed. Holes and slots = Lett rotor in contact with the pads = less braking torque. Sure, maybe they are great for a race car that gets the rotors glowing on a regular basis.....but for truck, I want all the braking power I can get.....and stock/OEM rotors provide the most surface area for pad contact.

Also, ceramic pads never seem to grip very good when they are cold. Semi-metallics are always best for that. Every time I thought "ok, I will try the ceramics one more time".....I kick myself for it. They just don't work good until they get hot.....and I want instant brake power, even when cold. New trucks don't come with ceramic pads for a reason......or drilled and slotted rotors.
 

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Idk why they dont come with them, but it might be because manufactures just try to save a dime and dont put good good brakes on them
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You get more friction area out of OEM rotors.....all of those holes and slots are areas that aren't touching the pad. You want as much surface area on the rotor as you can get.

Those drilled and slotted rotors are just a gimmick.....at least on passenger vehicles.
 

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You get more friction area out of OEM rotors.....all of those holes and slots are areas that aren't touching the pad. You want as much surface area on the rotor as you can get.

Those drilled and slotted rotors are just a gimmick.....at least on passenger vehicles.
They made a huge difference on my truck. The pads and rotors I took off where fairly new, about 2k on them. I wouldn't put them back on unless it was an "emergency". They simply couldn't stop my truck in less than half a block, God forbid someone stopped short in front of me.
 

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You know, I just thought of something. I also had a slight spongy feel for a while after I flushed my lines. I didn't think I had air in the system, but it was recommended that I find a way to activate the anti-lock because an air bubble or two may have made its way into the system and gotten lodged in there....a maze of lines and valves. Supposedly you can put the truck on jack stands, put it in gear, and then apply the brakes. The front brakes should slow quicker than the rear which will cause the ABS system to engage. Do this repeatedly and it should purge any possible air in the ABS valves. I didn't get to do that, but I did get plenty of snow to activate the system. It actually took quite a bit of activation, but eventually, one day after a couple long ABS activations, my brakes suddenly firmed up.
 
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