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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive looked around the fourum for the last hour and cant find anything relating to what i want to know. So the turbo in my truck needs rebuilt and it is going to get the full ebpv delete. My question is is there an easy way to delete the ebpv for the time being. money is tight and i have a non ebpv outlet flange given to me buy a buddy. ive read that i can just put the flange on and unhook the sensor but is it truly that easy? the ebpv doesnt work at all and my egts are already high having stage 1 injectors and no intercooler. have a 3 inch downpipe and 6637 filter and im still sitting at about 1100 degrees going up hill under light throttle. More if im on it. seen about 1600 degrees at its peak but that was with 10k lb behind it
 

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Just disconnect the power plug to it, then just wire it into the open position

Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just disconnect the power plug to it, then just wire it into the open position

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im a little retarded how do you wire it open? ive already unplugged it since it doesnt work but id like to knock down egts and ive heard its usually about a 50-100 degree difference
 

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I don't know about lowering EGT's, when it is working properly the butterfly is open where the exhaust has a pretty much free flow through it. It is when it is malfunctioning when there are problems with it or if it is sticking partially closed.

Do you have a EGT gauge to where you can monitor the temperature?
 

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If you already have the high-flow outlet, that in itself will delete the shaft and butterfly of the valve. That should lower EGTs by about 50F (my experience on my 94 with a modified pedestal and gutted valve). There will be nothing to "wire open" (meaning to tie the valve in the open position). To keep the valve's remaining hydraulic actuator from cycling, you simply disconnect the 2-wire weatherpack type connector for the solenoid found at the base of the turbo on the driver's side. On most trucks, it shouldn't cause a CEL, but if it does you can insert a 10 ohm 1-watt resistor across the harness side of the connector that you disconnected. This will fool the PCM into thinking the solenoid is still connected. Cheers!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know about lowering EGT's, when it is working properly the butterfly is open where the exhaust has a pretty much free flow through it. It is when it is malfunctioning when there are problems with it or if it is sticking partially closed.

Do you have a EGT gauge to where you can monitor the temperature?
yes cruising with no boost and out of the throttle it sits around 6-700 and as soon as i hit a hill it starts going up. highest ive seen is 1600. which scares me with these since they are bushing turbos. my 03 cummins would wrap the 2500 egt gauge before it would worry me. but the truck also made 840whp. this is setup to make 350 or so with the turbo upgrade when i get the money to rebuild it. not alot but enough to have a decent daily/tow rig
 

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Thanks for that information Patric. Now when you jogged my memory it does seam like I can remember reading about it increasing the EGT's slightly.

Aoldring, I wouldn't worry about the turbo with the temperatures up to 1600 degrees but I would worry about starting to melt a piston. The melting point is right near 1300 degrees and if held there for very long you are asking for troubles, how did you get 2500 degrees on a 03 Cummins with no problems? That is way past the melting point of automotive aluminum.

To help cooling the exhaust I would be looking at a inner-cooler. You also don't say if you still have the stock downpipe or if it has been changed out to a round one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for that information Patric. Now when you jogged my memory it does seam like I can remember reading about it increasing the EGT's slightly.

Aoldring, I wouldn't worry about the turbo with the temperatures up to 1600 degrees but I would worry about starting to melt a piston. The melting point is right near 1300 degrees and if held there for very long you are asking for troubles, how did you get 2500 degrees on a 03 Cummins with no problems? That is way past the melting point of automotive aluminum.

To help cooling the exhaust I would be looking at a inner-cooler. You also don't say if you still have the stock downpipe or if it has been changed out to a round one.
To be quite honest I have no clue. I had a 2500 degree egt gauge in it. Truck would max it and go back into the 3-500 range. But that was on a stock turbo back side with a ww2 and 180hp injectors. Could’ve just been the gauge messing up but the truck had a lot of go fast goodies. Seemed like all the fuel and not enough air. It would black out the hwy.
 

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I’d go easy on the EGTs, not sure where you have the temp probe, pre-turbo (like in the driver’s side E manifold) I don’t do more than 1250 degrees F. Post turbo temp probe (in down pipe) can show 400 degrees F hotter then at E manifold.

Best temp probe location is pre turbo MO. It doesn’t take a lot to crack pistons, so I’d be cautious and if you do run it up don’t do it for long and let it cool down prior to shut down.
Best bet is intercooler and/or water injection.
 

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JCart -

Post turbo temp probe (in down pipe) can show 400 degrees F hotter then at E manifold.
I think you meant to say 400*F cooler post turbo. Which is why the pre-turbo measurement is more critical as it is hotter. :)

Cj
 

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Of course @cjfisher… mahahahaa sorry for confusion fellas!
 
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