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Discussion Starter #1
In my limited understanding of air flow into a head, I understand the benefit of swirl. But does that really matter when it is boosted by a turbo 20+ psi? What effect does extrude honing the heads do to effect the swirl or does that really matter since more air is getting in to the chambers due to smoother pathways and lager port volumes. I have seen on gas engines where a hack port job will cost power, but does that hold true in this application? Is a basic growth of port volume when pressurized by a turbo better than the stock configuration?


I am trying to learn about the flow from people with porting experience, extrude hone experience or a combo of both. If you have dyno numbers, flow bench info, anything also to post please do. I didn't mention valves as a place for improvement either but that is part of this equation, so feel free to go there as well.


thanks
micky
 

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One thing to remember is that the combustion chamber is in the piston somewhat in the center of the cylinder. Remember where you are trying to get the air to and you are also trying to get the air to induce swirl around the piston bowl as well.
 

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Captain Negativity!
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There is machining on the face of the head around the intake valve. It's cut on an angle on the sides of the valves. This makes the air swirl when the valves open.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doug, your saying that the shape in the runners doesn't really matter then?
 

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Captain Negativity!
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Doug, your saying that the shape in the runners doesn't really matter then?
It won't matter as much. You can't make enough change due to the casting limitation. You can port them. But as far as raising things, no go. Need more cylinder to work with.
 
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