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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #1
I posted this on FTE a few weeks ago. Sorry to take so long to post it here on PSN.


Being that the OAT was getting down to -10 F this week I though this would be a good opportunity to do a comparison of some anti-gelling fuel additives. This wasn’t a very scientific test, but a good visual representation of how the fuel I used reacted with 3 different anti-gel additives.

The additives I used were:

Power Service Diesel Kleen (white bottle)
Howe’s Dieseltreat anti-gel
Schaeffer’s Dieseltreat 2000 Winterized

I would have also liked to use Stanadyne Winter 1000 but I could not find any on short notice.

The diesel fuel I used came from a local gas station and kept in my garage where the inside air temp was 52 F. I wanted to make sure the fuel was above the cloud point since it is key to add an anti-gel additive to fuel before it reaches it’s cloud point. If you add an anti-gel additive after the fuel has reached the cloud point then it will not be able to disperse the wax crystals since they have already stared to form and grow.

I mixed each additive with 20 oz of #2 diesel. Since Howe’s recommended a double treatment for Pickups and/or when OAT is below 0 degrees F. I decided to be fair and double dose the treatment ratio of all the additives.


1) For pickups Howe’s recommends a treatment ratio of 1 oz per 2.5 gallons of fuel. Which equals .4oz per gallon.

2) Diesel Kleen’s Double treatment ratio is 8 oz per 10 gallons. Which equals .8 oz per gallon.

3) Schaeffer’s double treatment ratio is 16 oz per 62.5 gallons. Which equals .256 oz per gallon.

Howe’s .4 oz per gallon -------- -----0.0625 oz for 20 oz of fue
Diesel Kleen .8 oz per gallon --------- 0.125 oz for 20 oz of fuel
Schaeffer’s .256 oz per gallon ------- 0.04 oz for 20 oz of fuel

I mixed the samples at 2 pm. Garage air temp 52 degrees.




I placed the samples outside at 7 pm, outside air temp 4 F. I wanted to simulate an approximate time period the truck would be sitting outside overnight.



 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #2
After 1 hour – 8 p.m. ----- no visual difference, OAT +2F.



After 2 hours 20 min - 9:20 p.m. ----- all samples show clouding, OAT +1 F.



After 3 hours – 10 p.m. ----- equal cloudiness, OAT 0 F.



After 4 hours 20 min – 11:20 p.m. ----- layering/wax drop out starting OAT -2F.


A little tough to see in the photo but if you look closely you can start to see some layering at the top of the jar as the wax crystals grow in size. They
reach a particle size which is too great to remain suspended in the fuel and start to drop out.

 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #3
After 5 hours 15 min – 12:15 a.m. ----- cloudiness continues to increase. Not much change from an hour ago, but some increased cloudiness.



After 11 hours 15 min – 6:30 a.m. ----- wax drop out

You can see the wax drop out in 3 out of 4 of the samples. So this is what I could have had happening in my fuel tank if my truck was parked outside overnight.



13 hours later – 8:00 a.m. -----

Here are some close ups of the individual samples.









Ok, so with this type of fuel each additive affected the gel point differently. But, I put the samples back in the garage and after 2 hours each of the treated fuel samples were clear and the wax crystals were able to be dispersed & suspended back in the fuel. The untreated sample still has some wax drop out.



Next I plan to add about 5mm of water to the samples and see what affect that has on them.

Two important notes to consider:

1. There are different ways that diesel fuel is refined and each refining process reacts differently with additives. That is why you see some additives work well for one person in one area of the country and then not work as well for someone else in another area. So it is very difficult to say that one additive is best. This is probably why you here about one additive working well for someone – then not work so well for someone else in a different region of the country.

2. If you can keep the fuel moving then it slows the wax drop out process considerably. That might be why systems with a fuel tank return line/Reg return will help prevent the wax drop out from happening so quickly.
 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #4
Here is some similar tests done with #1 Diesel and a 50/50 mix of #1 and #2.

Since tonight it will possibly get down to -12F I'm finally getting around to another gelling test.

I have 3 sample bottles set outside.

1. a 50/50 mix of #1 and #2
2. #1 Diesel
3. a 50/50 mix of #1 and #2 with Schaeffer's Winterized Dieseltreat

Put the samples out at 2 pm, +13F. You can easily see the variation in colors of the different samples.




at 6 pm, 4 hours after being place outside, the temp dropped to 9 degrees F. All samples still remained clear.



at 8:30 PM the OAT was +5 F, #1 Diesel sample remained clear. The 50/50 mix samples both started to show some haze/cloudiness, but no wax drop out.



at 6 a.m. the OAT was -7 F. #1 Diesel remained clear. Both 50/50 mixes were cloudy but the untreated 50/50 mix was cloudier than the 50/50 mix treated with the anti-gelling additive. There was some wax drop out in the untreateded 50/50 mix, very little compared to the straight #2 pics posted previously.



at 8 a.m. OAT was -5 F. Same observations as 6 a.m.



Some wax drop out on the bottom of the untreated 50/50 mix container, a thin layer.





better add the treated 50/50 mix picture for comparison. So even with a 50/50 mix of #1 and #2 it seems the additive did make a difference with this fuel at these temps.

 

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Edward Scissorhand WanaB
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Cool little study you did.
 

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Work in progress
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Awesome test! I always mix double for Howes and run #2 and no problems. Except one time, the diesel must not have mixed with the Howes when I filled up and started to gell up. I pulled it into a warm shop for about a hour and it must of mixed then because it was fine after that. I might have to try some schaeffers next winter.
 

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Been running schaeffers all winter this year and have had zero problems. Another cool thing that maybe was in my head but the first time that I ran it in my truck it sounded quiter, as in the engine its self. Awesome testing!
 

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Just stumbled on this thread thanks to the bump. So which version of PowerService was this, gray or white bottle?
White bottle, it's mentioned in parenthesis in his first post.
 

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peterbilt'in
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Very interesting study..

Now, where did you get #1 diesel? i have only ever seen #2. off hand i cant remember the differences, but wait, #1 is kero right?

i use Power service diesel kleen, but i add Way more then there recommended and have never had a problem... to my knowledge. lol but i cant see whats going on inside the tank.

Deff appreciate your research!
 

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awesome apparently #1 is chemically balanced not to gel until lower temps.
 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #12
awesome apparently #1 is chemically balanced not to gel until lower temps.
Correct, #1 Diesel has a gel point closer to -35F to -40F. The negative aspects are that #1 drops the Miles Per Gallon about 1-2 mpg on average. In addition, #1 does not have the same lubricity as #2. Most folks up here will run a 50/50 mix of the two. Last year (here locally) #1 was .40 cents per gallon more that #2, so the cost per fill up went up quite a bit. That is where some additives can come in to play, if the additive will only cost a few cents per gallon and can effectively drop the gell point than you can save approx. .35 cents per gallon. This year (here locally) the price difference between #1 and #2 was only about .15 cents - so it wasn't as huge of a cost savings as last year.
 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #13
Here are some additional pics on the water contamination test I mentioned I wanted to add to this post. Sorry it took so long for me to get this posted.

Many folks initially jump to gelling as being the problem during cold temps, but water contamination can cause problems much quicker than gelling. The water in these samples froze at the bottom of the containers within one hour.

Again, not a very scientific study or analysis - just a good visualization so we can get a better understanding of what might be going on inside the tank and/or engine.

According to the Standard, Diesel fuel can contain up to 100 ppm water. Most suppliers try to keep this under 50 ppm especially during the winter.

This is a #1 Diesel Sample with 2cc's of water added. The pic is a little fuzzy, but you can see the water droplets at the bottom of the sample.



This is a #2 diesel sample with 2 cc's of water added.



Here is a photo of both contaminated samples with Schaeffer's Winterized Dieseltreat additive that contains a water dispersent. It does seem that the additive was a bit more effective in the #1 diesel than in the #2 to the naked eye.



I'll add more info later. ran out of time for now.
 

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Freedom is not free
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Discussion Starter #14
here is a better close up pick of the contaminated samples with the 137ULSW additive.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Correction: I said the limit for water in Diesel was 100 ppm, that is not correct. It is higher than that. I need to find out what the ASTM standard is.

edit: from what I have found the allowable level is .05% which should equate to 500 ppm.
 

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awesome info! btw nice house.
 

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OEM Moderator
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I made this a sticky in this section since there is some very good information in here. I also left the thread open so that others can add to this discussion or Rich can add information. Thanks Rick.


Tom
 

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oil burner
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wow i guess i was lucky to get through the winter on straight no 2.i even had some oil mixed with it a few times and im sure that dont help.
 

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Missouri 05
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my 1st year with a diesel....What is the temp that you have to worry about the fuel gelling? I am in the KCMO area and it is still in the 40s at night.
 

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no one has said this. BUT good god its cold where you live.
I do belive my blood would freeze their
 
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