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Contrary to some folks' experiences on later models, installing Anzo projector headlights (#111183) on my '95 F250 PowerStroke was a fairly lengthy ordeal, but the result is nearly everything that I wanted. The only complaint about the lights' performance is a "notch" in the middle of the top of each beam's pattern. I'd have preferred a straight cutoff all the way across. Hoping to make life easier for other OBS installers, here's a summary of my experience.

Each side is similar, with a few minor exceptions. Start by removing one battery. You could now remove the stock headlamp, but you might as well give yourself more room and remove the battery tray as well, since you're going to have to do so later. Six bolts and two rivets (passenger side) or one rivet (driver's side) hold the tray in. On the driver's side, you'll also have to remove a nut holding part of the intake plenum in place. Drill out the rivet(s). Remove the tray (and part of the intake plenum on the driver's side).

Note that when you remove the two bottom tray bolts, as a result of years of gradual corrosion, you'll almost certainly destroy the captive extruded U-nuts below. You can get replacements from Ford, but I found it cheaper, easier, and quicker to replace the stock M8 X 1.5 fasteners with 5/16-18 bolts and extruded U-nuts from my local Ace hardware store. Also, I replaced the rivets with 1/4-20 bolts, lock washers, and nuts.

Remove the headlight and running / turn signal sockets and lamps. Remove two Phillips self-tapping screws from the top of the bezel and two 1/4" nuts from the lower mounting studs. The latter are accessible through two holes in the frame, and are not visible. You'll be working blind with a 7/16" ratchet. Remove the clips from the two locating studs at the top of the assembly by pulling upwards. I used a piece of coat hanger wire with a small hook bent at the end. Pull the headlight assembly a little way forward and remove the two parking / marker sockets and lamps.

Remove the clip retaining the stock aligning assembly by the same method you used to remove the clips on the top locating studs. Remove the aligning assembly. It's not compatible with the Anzo lights. Drill a hole about 3/4" diameter and centered at a 45 degree angle downward and inboard from the edge of the hole where the aligning assembly was mounted. (You'll effectively elongate the original mounting hole downward and inward). From the inside of the engine compartment, drill a 1/2" hole in the frame member directly behind the alignment screw on the Anzo unit. I drilled a pilot, then gradually stepped up to 1/2", finally reaming it, first from the engine compartment and finally from the above-mentioned elongated hole until the bit was able to run lengthwise (front-to-back) of the vehicle. You now have access to the alignment screw.

Slide the Anzo unit unit position and check for proper fit. I had to add shims on the lower inboard stud on each side (1/4" on one side, 3/16" on the other) to get the bezel to line up properly with the grille. It may appear that you also need to shim the upper outboard locating stud, but don't. I found (after several false starts) that the whole assembly pulls in nicely when the nuts on the lower studs are tightened. It's not an absolutely perfect fit, but fortunately, plastic is somewhat forgiving.

Install the parking / turn signal lamp & socket, and plug in the headlamp, running, and halo pigtails. The running and halo pigtails are pretty short, but with care, you can get them plugged in. A couple more inches of length would have been nice.

When reassembling everything, I dabbed all the threads with Never-Seize.

Align the new unit before proceeding to the other side, since you have to have the battery out to access the alignment screw. That's one nice thing about having a dual-battery setup. Fortunately, headlight aiming isn't a frequently-required task.

Hope somebody finds this helpful.
 

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So do the Anzos replace the stock headlight assembly? I've never seen them and can't really tell why you're removing the battery tray. I'm retrofitting mine with projectors inside the stock (clear replacements actually) type headlight buckets and there's no need to mess with the battery trays.
 

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So do the Anzos replace the stock headlight assembly? I've never seen them and can't really tell why you're removing the battery tray. I'm retrofitting mine with projectors inside the stock (clear replacements actually) type headlight buckets and there's no need to mess with the battery trays.

What clear headlights did you buy? I can't decide if I just want OEM or clear headlight. Im keeping everything else OEM..
 

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Contrary to some folks' experiences on later models, installing Anzo projector headlights (#111183) on my '95 F250 PowerStroke was a fairly lengthy ordeal, but the result is nearly everything that I wanted. The only complaint about the lights' performance is a "notch" in the middle of the top of each beam's pattern. I'd have preferred a straight cutoff all the way across. Hoping to make life easier for other OBS installers, here's a summary of my experience.

Each side is similar, with a few minor exceptions. Start by removing one battery. You could now remove the stock headlamp, but you might as well give yourself more room and remove the battery tray as well, since you're going to have to do so later. Six bolts and two rivets (passenger side) or one rivet (driver's side) hold the tray in. On the driver's side, you'll also have to remove a nut holding part of the intake plenum in place. Drill out the rivet(s). Remove the tray (and part of the intake plenum on the driver's side).

Note that when you remove the two bottom tray bolts, as a result of years of gradual corrosion, you'll almost certainly destroy the captive extruded U-nuts below. You can get replacements from Ford, but I found it cheaper, easier, and quicker to replace the stock M8 X 1.5 fasteners with 5/16-18 bolts and extruded U-nuts from my local Ace hardware store. Also, I replaced the rivets with 1/4-20 bolts, lock washers, and nuts.

Remove the headlight and running / turn signal sockets and lamps. Remove two Phillips self-tapping screws from the top of the bezel and two 1/4" nuts from the lower mounting studs. The latter are accessible through two holes in the frame, and are not visible. You'll be working blind with a 7/16" ratchet. Remove the clips from the two locating studs at the top of the assembly by pulling upwards. I used a piece of coat hanger wire with a small hook bent at the end. Pull the headlight assembly a little way forward and remove the two parking / marker sockets and lamps.

Remove the clip retaining the stock aligning assembly by the same method you used to remove the clips on the top locating studs. Remove the aligning assembly. It's not compatible with the Anzo lights. Drill a hole about 3/4" diameter and centered at a 45 degree angle downward and inboard from the edge of the hole where the aligning assembly was mounted. (You'll effectively elongate the original mounting hole downward and inward). From the inside of the engine compartment, drill a 1/2" hole in the frame member directly behind the alignment screw on the Anzo unit. I drilled a pilot, then gradually stepped up to 1/2", finally reaming it, first from the engine compartment and finally from the above-mentioned elongated hole until the bit was able to run lengthwise (front-to-back) of the vehicle. You now have access to the alignment screw.

Slide the Anzo unit unit position and check for proper fit. I had to add shims on the lower inboard stud on each side (1/4" on one side, 3/16" on the other) to get the bezel to line up properly with the grille. It may appear that you also need to shim the upper outboard locating stud, but don't. I found (after several false starts) that the whole assembly pulls in nicely when the nuts on the lower studs are tightened. It's not an absolutely perfect fit, but fortunately, plastic is somewhat forgiving.

Install the parking / turn signal lamp & socket, and plug in the headlamp, running, and halo pigtails. The running and halo pigtails are pretty short, but with care, you can get them plugged in. A couple more inches of length would have been nice.

When reassembling everything, I dabbed all the threads with Never-Seize.

Align the new unit before proceeding to the other side, since you have to have the battery out to access the alignment screw. That's one nice thing about having a dual-battery setup. Fortunately, headlight aiming isn't a frequently-required task.

Hope somebody finds this helpful.
any pics?
 

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What clear headlights did you buy? I can't decide if I just want OEM or clear headlight. Im keeping everything else OEM..
I couldn't even tell you the brand. Found them on eBay is all that I remember. I didn't really care what brand they were. All of them are made offshore any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So do the Anzos replace the stock headlight assembly? I've never seen them and can't really tell why you're removing the battery tray. I'm retrofitting mine with projectors inside the stock (clear replacements actually) type headlight buckets and there's no need to mess with the battery trays.
If you're just upgrading the stock buckets, you don't need to remove the battery trays. That's only necessary if you have to drill through the frame member to allow access to the aiming adjustment screw on each Anzo unit.

The lights that I installed were Anzo P/N 111183.
 

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I fully understand that with stock buckets, as I clearly stated.

I have no idea what the Anzos look like and really am not interested enough to go look for myself.

Pictures of what you did would be helpful for those who are interested though.
 
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