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I got a early SD 7.3 I picked up cheap knowing it needed work. First diesel but I am pretty handy and know where to go for help (powerStrokeNation).
The truck was using alot of oil and ran pretty crappy. When I picked it up it only smoked on start up and went away after warm. I have replaced 4 injectors and all injector o-rings. But I still have large oil consumption and lots of white smoke! I have not ran any tests as I do not have a scanner or anything. I know all injectors are spitting oil so they should all be good. The turbo shaft feels firm very little play. My coolant does not have oil in it from what I can tell, my oil level drops to quick to tell anything with that. My diesel fuel is pretty black from having 2 bad o-rings but I do not think that should be a problem.
I do not know what the problem is. I assume the oil must still be getting into the fuel as there is no way I can burn 1-2 quarts in the 20 min I had it running trying to diagnose it. The white smoke stayed even when warmed up. I did run it low on oil after I though I fixed it the first time with new o-rings.

Tomorrow I will replace the other 4 injectors with a newer set I bought on here and see if that has any results. After that I am pretty much lost on this truck.
 

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Are you sure its not puddling up in the valley that's a lot of oil for 20 mins of run time. Or mabey the pedistal o rings are shot and the oil is running down the back of the engine. Might also want to check the exhaust if it had a muffler it could be getting in and pooling up in there
 

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I would highly recommend that you run a compression test on the engine prior to replacing anything else.

If the cranking compression is good...then the engine can be fixed, and is probably worth investing in...if the compression is not good, then you can save your money for an engine rebuild.

keep in mind that at high(er) altitude, air density is going to lower the compression numbers...

Altitude Factor
500 0.987
1500 0.960
2500 0.933
3500 0.907
4500 0.880
5500 0.853
6500 0.826
7500 0.800
8500 0.773

so...if you're in Denver @ 5280' elevation....a 'perfect' compression engine would show about 345psi (which equates to over 400psi at sea level)

if you get readings down into the mid to low 200's for compression (at altitude)..then your piston rings/cylinder walls are probably the cause of the oil consumption.
 
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