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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just wondering how power is distributed to subs with a mono amp...


Lets say there is an amp that is 1-ohm stable and you have however many subs it takes to achieve 1-ohm. Lets say the amp is rated for 600 watts at 1-ohm. Does that mean that each sub recieves 600 or is the 600 split up between the subs(150x4 for example)?

Any help would be great!



Thanks



Derrick
 

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Ohms is just the resistance. The way you wire the amp to the speaker or speakers determines ohms. You really do not want to run at one ohm. The more ohms the better the sound quality. 600 watts with one ohm is like a crow with a very loud megaphone. however that same amp wired more traditionally would be 150 watts at 4 ohms. It would still be very nice. 300 watts at 2 ohms. 75 watts at 8 ohms. My friend produced a dual voice coil speaker back in the day that was a dual 6 ohm resistance speaker. Watts is not the end all be all measurement of power.
 

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6Leaker
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Correct that the power gets split evenly to each sub, no matter what the resistance is. The amp will produce different power levels for different resistances though generally doubleing as the resistance is cut in half (4ohm to 2ohm and 2ohm to 1ohm)

I forget the spec but I believe it is dampening factor that drops as the resistance drop creating the lesser sound quality due to the lower resistance. However for many it is an inaudible difference, especially in subwoofers since the range they play is soo small. But this difference in sound quality for mids and tweeters and such will be more noticable.

My sub is currently at wired up to 1ohm and getting about 500+ more watts than its rated power, but its also XBL^2 instead of the normal underhung design so its a bit cleaner sounding naturally.
 

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Word
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The amp will split power evenly to however many subs you have it wired to, and the lower the impedance i.e. 1 ohm, the more power the amp will produce, now you should never by rule of thumb run an amp at a lower impedance than what it was designed for i.e running a 2 ohm stable amp at 1 ohm...Here is the skinny on subs and power...if you run a sub that handles 500 watts RMS ( forget peak power handling ) at say 150 watts it's gonna sound like S--T bottom line...but if run it at say 375 to 450 it's gonna pound and sound great.....last example for you...if you have 2 subs that both handle 500 watts RMS, that means your ideal amp would be anywhere in the 800 to 1000 watt range (mono) ....DO NOT GET A 2 CHANNEL AMP AND BRIDGE IT TO 1 CHANNEL TO RUN SUBS....Also sound quality depends on the sensitivity of the sub, most are around 85-89 db, some are as high as 98 db....sound quality depends on the type of enclosure you put the subs in... i.e ported or sealed...sound quality depends on so many things....so to say that you shouldn't run at 1 ohm is crazy...I'll tell you what..wire in your 2 600 watt subs and run your amp at 150 at 4 ohms or 300 at 2 ohms and tell me what they sound like...I can tell you...it would sound like S--T...wire them in at 600 watt mono at 1 ohm and tell me what they sound like...you're right Pneuking when you say Ohms is just the resistance...the resistance of electricity to flow....more Ohms, less power !!!!
 
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