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Discussion Starter #1
So I notice when my 2003 6.0 (70k miles) sits in the cold at work not plugged in and I start it, it runs rough, and a little smoke comes out exhaust. In the same temperature outside, but at home plugged in over night, it does not run like that. So it’s obvious that cold temp has something to do with this in my mind. Can this be stiction? Or is it a symptom of wrong oil type? Previous owner had oil changed at a diesel shop but I’m pretty sure it was just conventional Kendal oil and probably15-40. Not sure if I should change oil to 5w-40, add oil additive to it, or Chalk it up to cold temps and cold engine (western ,ny, current temp in the teens). I’d hate to change oil and filter since they just changed it 500 miles ago with new filter. Any advice would be awesome. Thanks
 

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Train Whistlin' Ex driver
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I can't say if it's stiction or not (but is seems we're all paranoid about it), but I can say that mine does the same thing. When it gets below 30 or so (cold for the south) there will be some whitish smoke out the exhaust for maybe a minute, but it's all clear by the time the high idle kicks on. The idle is maybe a touch rougher than normal at first, but evens out within about 30 seconds. Check that the smoke smells of diesel and not coolant, and if it is running 15w40 may switch out to 5w-40, I know mine likes it better in the cold. I suppose you could try exchanging some oil for archoil and see if it helps.
 

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"resident smarty pants"
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All I know is that Ford does not recommend using 15W40 below 20 degrees F. They say NOT to use it below 10 degrees F.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I figure the oil is probably too thick for cold starts. I would agree that it’s a small amount of whiteish smoke and only for 30 or so seconds. Idle is a little rough but it does clear up with high idle like you said. When plugged in at home and in garage even if it’s really cold out it does not run rough like that.
 

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Train Whistlin' Ex driver
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I agree, with the block heater plugged in it doesn't have the same symptoms. Look at your ECT and EOT after a couple hours plugged in; the truck is starting at a much higher temp, oil is flowing, fuel is warmer etc. so I'd think the injector response would be more accurate and with more complete combustion.
 

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6.0's seem to really like 5W40 synthetic, I run it in my 7.3 & 6.0 If you want to give it a boost, add a pint of Archoil when you change the oil. Some guys think it's just snake oil, maybe it is, but it's good snake oil and it works.

Before I get flamed, the proper fix for stiction is to remove the injectors & sand the spools. That said, for minor cases both Archoil & Rev-X have strong detergents and friction modifiers and either one will help.
 

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Really the proper fix is to replace the injectors. Rev x might work, only one way to find out. Sanding the spools probably will work, as long as you don't increase the clearances.

Three options, take your pick. Make sure it's actually stiction first.
 

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I had the same issue with my truck during a recent cold snap. I added a quart of Archoil as the oil was fresh in December. It did the job for now. I plan on changing from 15w-40 to either 5w-40 or 10w-30 as I only put on about 5000 miles a year now as I am retired. Truck only used to pull my 5th wheel and oil is changed once a year..
 

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I had the same issue with my truck during a recent cold snap. I added a quart of Archoil as the oil was fresh in December. It did the job for now. I plan on changing from 15w-40 to either 5w-40 or 10w-30 as I only put on about 5000 miles a year now as I am retired. Truck only used to pull my 5th wheel and oil is changed once a year..
Make sure when you do drive it, you get it up to full operating temp and let the condensation and crud burn out of the engine. Also a very good idea to keep your fuel tank full as to not leave air space that allows condensation.
 

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Make sure when you do drive it, you get it up to full operating temp and let the condensation and crud burn out of the engine. Also a very good idea to keep your fuel tank full as to not leave air space that allows condensation.
This is good advice for any vehicle. I've seen oil that looked like a head gasket was bad because it was so milky. Turns out it was an old lady who only drove it to the gas station down the road and back.
 
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