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Lubrication Addict!!
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After doing some searching around... I came across this small mod.. Can someone please explain to me exactly what the Exhaust Backpressure Valve does? and exactly what this terminator does? After I had bought my 7.3L I did take my sensor out and ran some very thick weedeater string down through the tube to make sure it was not plugged with soot... But I really never thought about what this senor or valve was for.

Thanks Lonnie

99-03 Ford 7.3L Powerstroke Exhaust Backpressure Valve Terminator
 

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Lubrication Addict!!
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Discussion Starter #3
How would a fella, go about gutting the sensor?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ah--Hmmm-ok--Thanks
 

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Lubrication Addict!!
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Discussion Starter #7
pardon my ignorance to this matter... does anyone have a pic of this valve that is on the exhaust side of the turbo. I have left my 7.3L basically stock for reliability issues... I'm slowly getting more brave and doing more myself.
 

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TennesseeHillbilly
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Lubrication Addict!!
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Discussion Starter #10
Ok---Thanks guys. So Basically this terminator is for those who want to disable the sensor? And still the senor will not send a code to pcm? I'm not reading between the lines to well tonight?
 

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All done now
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Correct. Without it, it will throw a code, but not a light.
 

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I wouldn't be so sure. Excursions and CA trucks have thrown a code AND a light even when the air temp sensor in the air box is unplugged.
 

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All done now
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CA trucks don't count. And Excursions are pretty much CA trucks.
 

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Caption This
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I see no reason to disable it if you don't remove the shaft and flapper. And if you remove the shaft and flapper there is no reason to unplug anything.
 

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I see no reason to disable it if you don't remove the shaft and flapper. And if you remove the shaft and flapper there is no reason to unplug anything.
But even if you do remove the shaft and flapper, should you disable it? Doesn't the ECM use it for some processing? Or so I have been told?
 

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King of my own world
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did anyone question the fact that is a plug for $38????
 

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The OP mentioned the EBPV and the Exhaust Back Pressure Sensor in the same question. These are two different things entirely. The EBPV is used to control the butterfly valve on the the turbine side of the exhaust outlet. This is used to increase back pressure and consequently cylinder temps when the engine is cold. It is driven off several reference points such as engine temp, ambient temp, etc. If you disable this like many others you will see a DTC show up indicating the sensor is open. If you disable the actual valve and leave the EBPV solenoid plugged in you may see a large oil leak at the valve cylinder on the pedestal. The best way to get rid of this valve is to buy a non-ebpv pedestal and exhaust housing for the turbo. Then get the pigtail sold by dfuser or others that fakes the circuit at the EBPV solenoid. Or if you had to you could wire the valve open and gut the pedestal. Search for "Gutting EBPV". There is no real reason to do this. I did mine when I replaced my entire turbo and only had to buy the Ped since my turbo did not have an EBPV housing. Eliminating this solenoid using the pigtail has no effect on engine performance or drivability. Leaving it open has no effect other than setting a DTC indicating the solenoid is open.

The Exhaust Back Pressure Sensor is mounted on the front of the engine and is fed by a 1/4 inch hard line the runs from the rear of the rear pass side exhaust manifold, over the top pass side of the motor and into this sensor. This is the tube you originally ran some Weedeater string through. This sensor feeds the amount of exhaust back pressure to the PCM and is used to trim fuel delivery and will have an effect on fuel economy. Don't disable this sensor.

Not all the mods here and elsewhere are beneficial. Disabling the EBPV will not have a negative affect on cold weather performance unless you live in sub zero temps. Otherwise it is a bit costly to just do it for no real reason. Good reasons are:

Leaking EBPV valve
Installing and aftermarket turbo without the EBPV housing.
 

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Lubrication Addict!!
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Discussion Starter #19
NorCal: Thank U! Thats the answers I was looking for... I guess when my stock turbo chooses to retire, I will look into replacing it with a turbo, without the EBPV housing. Until then, I will just remove the sensor and roto rooter the tube out... I took about 25min the first time, no really big deal.

Thanks again
 

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NorCal: Thank U! Thats the answers I was looking for... I guess when my stock turbo chooses to retire, I will look into replacing it with a turbo, without the EBPV housing. Until then, I will just remove the sensor and roto rooter the tube out... I took about 25min the first time, no really big deal.

Thanks again
Like I said. The sensor you're "roto-rootering" and the EBPV are two separate things. If you already cleaned out the Exhaust Back Pressure tubing that feeds the Exhaust Back Pressure sensor then you should be good. The EBPV is entirely different and will have no effect on performance unless the EBPV is stuck closed or partially closed in which case you will see your EGT's skyrocket.
 
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