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My BS meter is going off on this one.:bsflag: What do you guys think? He lists some stuff he did to it but I'm thinking mid 20s at best. Check it out.

 

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I'd like to see what hand calculated numbers are, and what propane system he is running?
 

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It's called the lie-O-meter for a reason lol. I could see 19-21 mpg hand calculated.
 

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It doesn't appear that he is accounting for the propane.

That would be appropriate if he got his propane for free, but I doubt he does so.
 

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I had a 6.0 that got that good of fuel millage on almost every tank. Only because it broke down on almost every tank and was on a flatbed for at least a hundered miles to get to the dealer I bouget it from.
:peeman::peeman::peeman:
 

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It doesn't appear that he is accounting for the propane.

That would be appropriate if he got his propane for free, but I doubt he does so.
Hey Dave,

Could it potentially be worth it if you ran the propane and actually saw an increase like this in mileage or at least similar to this. If so, what kind of propane system would you need and what affects on the motor would the propane cause? What about compressed natural gas as an option, that might be cheaper than propane? Hell if its possible, I have a decent sized stainless tank we took off of a truck at work I might be able to use?
 

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It all depends on how much each fuel costs.

Around here diesel goes about $4.09/gal ($29.21/MMBTU)
Propane goes about $2.79/gal ($29.36/MMBTU)
CNG goes for around $1.50/gge ($12.50/MMBTU)

That's retail at a filling station set up for fueling motor vehicles.

CNG has an advantage because its not taxed. That will certainly change, at least in commercial filling stations.

Propane and CNG are just auxiliary fuel. By themselves they'd never run a diesel as their cetane rating is too low. In a diesel you used the No.2 injector as a spark plug to blowtorch the aux fuel into burning.

The guy is not being honest with us (or himself) because he is not telling us the propane flow rate.

CNG requires tanks and piping rated for either 3,000 or 3,600 psig. Don't know about propane. To make CNG you need a compressor that looks a lot like a scuba air compressor but with a bigger aftercooler.

There is (or was) a home CNG compressor called a PHYLL that would take a day or two to fill a 10 gallon equivalent CNG tank. It needed 240 V power and a regular residential gas service. A big (more commercial style) Ingersoll-Rand compressor needs a 480V 3 phase service and 50 psi gas service. It will fill up a 10 gallon equivalent tank in about 12 hours.

If I had an economical source of either gaseous fuel I'd use it in a spark-ignition engine. It would be simpler.
 

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Jack Ken
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He should be in the area of about 20% LP, much more and it will cause trouble. so take 40mpg x 20% and thats about 32. take 32 x 20% and thats about 26. But its hard to stay at 20% without computer controls. There is a system out there, I install them but Im not going to advertise on here. We see roughly 20-30% increase in mpg with it to give you an idea.
 
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