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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question about rust prevention. I just got my 2014 CCSB today and I noticed the bed and the cab underneath have the same design as my 03 7.3 and I was wondering if anyone else who lives in the rust belt like me is already experiencing any rust underneath? I am thinking about spraying the whole underneath with Eastwood Rust Encapsulator, it is supposed to be salt resistant and hold up for a long time. I know on my 7.3 that the bed channels were rotting out and under the cab the brace that ties into the inner rocker was so rotted away that I had to take a wiz wheel and cut it off because it holds moisture and salt. Now this is my first brand new vehicle and I really don't want this to start rusting in about 4 years. Has anyone had good luck with constantly rinsing off the underneath during the winter to get the salt off when the roads are bad? Sorry this is so long but for the price of this truck I would like for it to at least last 8 to 10 years rust free.
 

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I have the same thing here I West Virginia. They use calcium chloride a lot here and it rust vehicles faster than salt I think.
I had mine undercoated and rustproofed. It was a bit pricey, butt then so it body work. You pay me now, or you pay me later...

I hope the aluminum bodied F150 holds up and they then start using it on the Super Duty.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have used the 3M rubberized industrial coating and that stuff lays out nicely but I really don't want to start spraying that all over haha. The rust encapsulator comes in a clear so I was thinking that since its clear I could spray everything and not worry about getting overspray on anything. Aluminum body sounds nice, lets hope it holds up. Ford could be onto something. There is nothing more I hate than rust LOL.
 

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The aluminum body is something that should have happened 50 years ago when GM started using fiberglass in the Vette.
If you are inclined to do it yourself, I can tell you that buying two cases (24 cans) of spray undercoating will cover your truck nicely. I have a severe spinal cord injury and cannot do that sort of thing anymore, however, in the past when I bought a new truck that was the first thing I would do.

It was nice, because no one is going to do as good a job on your truck as you are. I recently bought three cans of a product called "Fluid Film". It' supposed to coat surfaces and keep them from rusting. I have never tried it before but have read that it does well. I bought the three cans and an extension nozzle for spraying in the bed rails for $51.35 on amazon. It does collect dust and is non hardening so in my mind would be better suited for the inside of the doors to keep them from rusting at the bottom seam.

I have tried the rust encapsulator from Eastwood. It's pricey, and I honestly think if one uses the spray rubberized undercoating, that you would be just as well off.

If you do this job yourself, be sure to wear long sleeves and a pair of old nylon hose on your head to cover your hair. Smear Vaseline on your face before hand. You need a couple of pieces of cardboard to shield overspray when along the painted area like the tailgate.
Lastly, it would be advisable not to do the job in a clean garage as it causes a mess and wifey could get testy. If you do it outside DO NOT repeat DOO NOOT do it with any kind of wind as the overspray WILL coat the entire truck. It's a real bummer to have to buff out a 3 day old truck. If there is no wind you will be fine and the job will turn out great.

When it comes to the Undercoating, I have found that anything 3M makes is of high quality.

I had my 2014 done professionally this time. While they did a good job, I know that the attention to detail cannot be there compared to what I did myself. It cost me $500, so you can figure up your costs and compare if it is actually worth doing it yourself. The place I had it done has a lifetime rust through warranty. I have to take it in yearly and pay $40 for them to go over it and touch up any problem areas.

It occurs to me that I used to have about $200 in everything.

Lastly, Thank you for your service to our Country. My son was a Marine. Two tours in Iraq. I am retired law enforcement. (injured in the line of duty)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the info RJC2. The only reason I am thinking about the Eastwood product was because it was clear and black undercoating would cover everything and all the wires and stuff so I am kind of leary about using a black rubberized undercoating. I know that the main issues of concern are under the cab behind the inner rocker and up to the frame as that is where most of the salt and rust form and in the horribly designed bed channels. I do have a paint shop at work which is nice that I can use to spray the encapsulator without any issues but I do know what you mean by the undercoating working nicely as the 3M I used on my 7.3 was great. I guess I would have to see what a professionally done undercoating job looks like to determine if that is the route to go. I ordered my truck with rear plastic inner fender wells in the bed so hopefully that will cut down on the amount of water and salt thrown up there & I have the mud flaps on the front as well. I really wish they could come up with something better to melt ice, I envy those who drive around 90's Ford trucks down south and don't have a spot of rust on them. I am sorry to hear that you were injured in the LODD hopefully with your spinal injury you can still get around somewhat and also thank you for your service. I was in Fallujah from Sept of 05 to Apr 06 and Oct 07 to May 08 with 2nd Tank Bn out of Camp Lejeune NC.
 

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From the rust area in Canada, Do not use anything that provides a solid/hard/sealing type of product. If it ever cracks the moisture and salt get underneath. You can not see this until it comes out on the other side. Always use a liquid/penetrating type of fluid and I know it needs to be reapplied every year or two but that is the only way to do the right job. Fluid Film is one of these products, a little pricy, also in Winnipeg we have a Rust Check dealer that only costs about 150 per year and will guarantee you will never have rust on your vehicle. 1500 for 10 years and it will look just as good as driving out of the showroom, underneath at least. Sorry for the long post but that is my 50 plus years in a nutshell about rust protection. I use the rust check product I can buy at Canadian tire and spray my own areas of concern and have never had a tailgate or door seam with any rust.
 

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We use twenty pound magnesium alloy blocks inside heat exchangers to prevent corrosion and bolting four of them onto the frame of my '05 truck seems to be working. :)


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Discussion Starter #8
I have heard of fluid film before and I even have a small free sample that I have not used. So you are saying that the rust encapsulator that will dry would probably not be the best idea? They claim that it has withstood 1,000 hours of continuous spray in a salt chamber. I know that the fluid film would probably also work but then I feel as if the whole underneath would be an oily mess but I could be wrong though. As far as magnesium blocks inside of heat exchangers goes I have never heard or seen of this haha but I would be interested in knowing more about that setup. I know that I have rinsed off salt off of my old truck and my wives car by the pounds this year. It has been so thick that I would sweep it up and throw it away and wash the rest down the floor drain in my garage.
 

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From my experience. Anything that becomes hard can crack and allow moisture behind it. I have no idea what this rust encapsulation stuff is. I also have heard that there are products out there like pore 45 ( I think) that converts rust to something harmless. If it drys to a hard finish then when your truck flexes I believe it will allow moisture to get between the cracks and touch the base metal. The only problem with stuff that doesn't actually dry is that it will attract dirt. Your truck will never rust but all the bolts will be easy to get to and never seize but will look dirty. Sorry
 

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1000 hours in a test chamber. Did they also flex that plate. If you know anything about statistics and polling people all the details work in favor of the product and not always in te favor of the real world. Lol
 

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Magnesium block would probably work like a sacrificial anode. All boats and motors in salt water use anodes for exactly that reason. The anode will lose its properties or dissipate as required to protect the original product. The science works but will the magnesium work for a vehicle or is a different anode product work better?
 

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These anodes are installed specifically to reduce rusting of the steel exchangers internals that are used on our recycle water coolers and this water has a lot of junk in it that likes to munch on steel. On my truck I have a spot on a fender that had the paint knocked off a one inch square area by a light three years ago and normally the salt on our roads would turn that one inch square bit of bare metal into a one foot square of rusty 'cancer' but it hasn't changed in size at all and just has light surface rust on the bare metal.


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Discussion Starter #13
I went to Canadian Tire and seen the Rust Cure prevention stuff, kind of looks like fluid film. The flexing if the truck makes sense and I could see that cracking and flaking off over time. As far as the POR 15 goes I have used it but not a huge fan. I stays on the skin for over a week if u spill it on yourself.
 

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They use a lot of de icer here when the temp is right as it only works in a narrow window of temperature. The striped road always gives it away. Every time I see it I go blow the $6 at chevron and get the bottom spray. Not sure it helps, but at least makes me think I did something.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am sure rinsing it off underneath on a regular basis during the winter has to help quite a bit. I think my 7.3 was so bad underneath because the original owners never took care of it and I could tell it was setup with the plow package so I bet the truck just plowed snow and sat there without anyone ever rinsing off the underneath. If I apply fluid film and I rinse off underneath the truck during the winter, won't that defeat the purpose of the fluid film and wash it away?
 

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Fluid film has some type of product in it that seems to neutralize rust, you notice this when you first put it on it seems to bubble away for awhile. It also has something in it that makes it creep or penetrate into seems and crevasse and displace any moisture. Yes the bulk of it may appear to wash off but it will remain in the corners and seams where it will do the most good anyways.
 

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I am sure there are other products out there that work the same. My point to all this is that you do not want a hard coating or sealant of any kind that will crack and allow moisture in behind or underneath it. You want something that remains liquid and also penetrates or wicks into the seams and crevasses and be water repellant if possible. Some people have very good luck with just old engine oil for rust protection, to me this is too dirty for my garage and stuff. Rust check products work great for me and are cheaper than the fluid film.
 

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In our brine treatment unit at work the structural steel is all sprayed with a thin layer of light gray 'stuff' that deforms a little when you tap on it with a wrench and if you pealed of a chunk it's impossible to tear it. Wish I knew what it was made of because any bare metal, even if its galvanized, disappears in less then five years.


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Discussion Starter #20
I am going to look into the Rust check and Fluid Film a little further. I am not sure if that rust encapsulator dries hard or not. But I would rather have something that is going to fill in the crevasses rather that flake off.
 
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