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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a '16 F350 / 6.7 with 122k miles about a month ago from a dealer mid-way across the country. About a week after buying it and driving it 2000 miles, I was driving (empty) down a long hill when I felt a violent shudder / knock and quickly pulled over. The local dealer wasn't able to diagnose other than a cylinder 3 misfire and 7% loss of compression, so I had it towed it to a specialty diesel shop.

They pulled apart the oil filter and found metal shavings. They are recommending a full engine replacement ($25k), or $5k in parts & labor if I supply my own long block + turbo. They also stated that there was no way the extent of damage witnessed occurred in the week that I had the vehicle.

I'm working with the selling dealer, who acknowledged that the wholesaler they acquired it from "did some work on it". They indicated that they would work on "making things right", but I'm obviously not 100% confident in this until it actually happens as I always plan for the worst.

I'm looking for some guidance on the following:
1) What's a reasonable cost for a long block replacement, both cost of the long block & labor+parts?
2) The diesel shop mentioned that Ford made some changes to the turbo, so I'd have to replace it too. Does this seem right?
3) Am I better off just finding a used engine, swapping it in, and then selling the vehicle?
4) If I just sell the vehicle as-is, how much of a hit will I take? I'm trying to figure out if it may make more sense to just sell it and let someone interested in dealing with the problem take care of it, though I suspect that's not a great idea.

Thanks for any guidance.
 

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What kind of metal shavings? Ferrous/non ferrous??

15/16 turbos are the same. There was a change in 2017.

15-20K on a drop in complete engine from ford is about right, plus labor.

I would pull apart the old one and fix it if it was mine. But then again, I do this for a living.
 

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And just some FYI the 6.7 is a very tough engine and very durable. The most common cause of failure is fuel system failure, but sometimes a failed injector can destroy a piston.
 

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And just some FYI the 6.7 is a very tough engine and very durable. The most common cause of failure is fuel system failure, but sometimes a failed injector can destroy a piston.
Good to know. I wish I knew what happened to it before I bought it, but I only had it a little over a week.

Knowing this, would you suggest considering the repair route, or is there not enough info yet? The current shop went right to replacement - they didn't even entertain the possibility of repair and I'm not sure where else in the area (Los Angeles) to try.
 

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You’d need to find someone who specializes in engine repair along with a good machine shop experienced in diesels. Of course if you can get them to pay for a brand new ford engine that would be the fastest, I would absolutely not opt for a used engine.
 
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